UNICEF – Humanitarian Action for Children - Ethiopia

We’re building a new UNICEF.org.
As we swap out old for new, pages will be in transition. Thanks for your patience – please keep coming back to see the improvements.

Map of Ethiopia
UNICEF photo: A girl pours water into a yellow jerrycan at a rural water point © UNICEF Ethiopia/2017/Sewunet A girl fetches water from a UNICEF-supported water point in Yabello town, Borena Zone, Oromia, one of the woredas affected by drought.

Ethiopia

In 2018, UNICEF and partners plan for:
3.11 million

people accessing sufficient water of appropriate quality and quantity for drinking, cooking and maintaining personal hygiene (more than 1 million through permanent infrastructure)

10.5 million

children received vitamin A supplementation

300,000

school-aged children, including adolescents, accessing quality education

2018 Requirements: US$111,810,939

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total people in need: 7.4 million1
Total children (<18) in need: 3.5 million2

Total people to be reached in 2018: 3.1 million
Total children to be reached in 2018: 1.5 million

Due to drought and large-scale displacement in the southern and south-eastern lowland areas of Ethiopia, humanitarian needs are expected to remain significant in 2018. As of September 2017, 1.3 million people, 64 per cent of whom are children, are displaced due to conflict and drought.3 The majority of these people will remain displaced in 2018. Ethiopia is also the second largest refugee-hosting country in Africa, with 889,000 registered refugees,4 58 per cent of whom are children, and another 120,000 refugees expected to arrive by the end of 2018.5 Some 8.5 million people were in need of food assistance during the second half of 2017, up from 5.6 million at the beginning of the year, and an estimated 5 to 7 million people will require food assistance in 2018.6 In addition, 7.4 million people will require access to safe water in 2018; 333,500 children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) will need treatment; and 3 million children will require treatment for moderate acute malnutrition.7 Some 600,000 people will need protection services8 and 1.7 million school-aged children will require urgent access to education. Vulnerabilities related to drought and displacement will put an estimated 6 million people at risk of disease outbreaks.9

Humanitarian strategy

2018 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 333,500 children under 5, including 13,500 refugee children, treated for SAM
  • 10.5 million children received vitamin A supplementation

Health

  • 56,000 children immunized against measles
  • 38,000 people affected by acute watery diarrhoea accessing life-saving curative interventions
  • 400,000 women and children under 5 accessing essential maternal and child health services

WASH

  • 3.11 million people accessing sufficient water of appropriate quality and quantity for drinking, cooking and maintaining personal hygiene (more than 1 million through permanent infrastructure)
  • 1.76 million people reached with key messages on hygiene practices

Child protection11

  • 58,300 girls and boys provided with psychosocial support, including access to child-friendly spaces with multi-sectoral programming interventions
  • 12,760 unaccompanied and separated girls and boys reunified with their families and/or placed in appropriate alternative care
  • 20,000 children and women provided with risk mitigation, prevention or response interventions to address gender-based violence

Education

  • 300,000 school-aged children, including adolescents, accessing quality education12

UNICEF will work with the Government and partners to reach affected populations with critical child protection, education, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and health interventions. As co-lead of the education, WASH and nutrition clusters and the child protection sub-cluster, UNICEF will support coordinated humanitarian response. Access to SAM treatment will be expanded and the early detection of acute malnutrition will be improved through community mobilization. UNICEF will strengthen the capacities of local health personnel to promote infant and young child feeding in emergencies through related training, including on integrated community-based management of acute malnutrition. UNICEF-supported mobile teams will provide life-saving health and nutrition services in the Afar and Somali regions. To facilitate better response to disease outbreaks, UNICEF will strengthen related prevention, preparedness and response mechanisms through training, supplies and emergency operations. The WASH response will focus on both life-saving activities and building resilient water and sanitation infrastructure, particularly for displaced populations. Children and women will receive protection risk-mitigation and prevention and response interventions, including for gender-based violence. Access to quality education in safe environments will be expanded for displaced and refugee children through the delivery of school supplies, the construction of temporary learning spaces and teacher training.

Results from 2017

As of 31 October 2017, UNICEF had US$89.6 million available against the US$135.9 million appeal (66 per cent funded).10 Since January, 255,623 children under 5 years have received SAM treatment provided at 18,036 centers supported by UNICEF and nutrition partners. Mobile health and nutrition teams targeting hard-to-reach and pastoralist communities reached 389,231 people with medical services and treatment in Somali and Afar regions. UNICEF also reached more than 47,700 people suffering from diarrhoeal disease with treatment. More than 2.2 million people gained access to safe water through water trucking, as well as the rehabilitation, maintenance and drilling of existing and new water points, particularly in areas affected by drought and at high risk of water-borne diseases. UNICEF worked with the Government to provide psychosocial support to more than 22,000 children. In addition, 6,541 children received temporary foster care and 912 children were reunified with their families. Critical funding shortages for education hampered UNICEF’s emergency response in this area, particularly its support for out-of-school children. Only 26 per cent of displaced children targeted for education interventions in 2017 gained access to schooling through the construction of temporary learning spaces in the Somali and Gambella regions.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Funding requirements

In line with the pre-Humanitarian Requirements Document developed by the Government of Ethiopia and humanitarian partners, UNICEF is requesting US$111,810,939 to meet the humanitarian needs of children in Ethiopia in 2018. Without timely and flexible funding, UNICEF will be unable to support the national response to the country's humanitarian crisis. Seasonal assessments, which are currently underway, will inform the finalization of the Humanitarian Requirements Document for 2018, which is expected to be published in February. This may lead to further revision of the Humanitarian Action for Children appeal.

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

_________________________
1 Pre-Humanitarian Requirements Document, November 2017.
2 Ibid.
3 International Organization for Migration, Displacement Tracking Matrix Round 7, 17 November 2017.
4 The refugee breakdown by countries is as follows: 47 per cent from South Sudan, 28 per cent from Somalia, 19 per cent from Eritrea and 5 per cent from the Sudan. Source: United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, October 2017.
5 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, October 2017.
6 Pre-Humanitarian Requirements Document, November 2017, with sector analysis of likely needs.
7 Ibid.
8 Identified protection risks include family separation, physical and sexual violence and exploitation, child labour, psychosocial vulnerability and migration that may result in harm.
9 Pre-Humanitarian Requirements Document, November 2017, with sector analysis of likely needs.
10 Available funds include US$56 million raised against the current appeal and US$33.6 million carried forward from the previous year.
11 Targets are lower than in 2017 given the assessment of needs in 2018 and the focus on the specific target community.
12 Target is lower than in 2017 given the assessment of needs in 2018 and the focus on camp settings.
13 Cluster coordination costs are included within the relevant sector budgets.