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Map of Ethiopia
UNICEF photo: Mother holds her child who receives an injection © UNICEF Ethiopia/2017/Ayene

Ethiopia

In 2017, UNICEF and partners plan for:
1.55 million

caregivers of children, and pregnant and lactating women accessing infant and young child feeding counselling

4.39 million

people, including 350,000 South Sudanese refugees, provided with access to safe water

622,000

school-aged children, including 188,000 refugees and host community children, accessing quality education (including through temporary structures)

2017 Requirements: US$135,901,523

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Snapshot

Total people in need: 10.5 million1
Total children (<18) in need: 5.46 million

Total people to be reached in 2017: 5.9 million2
Total children to be reached in 2017: 3.1 million

The Belg assessment of the seasonal rains (completed in June 2017) indicated deteriorating food and nutrition security and increasing risks of disease outbreaks, floods and conflicts, in particular in the drought affected areas. Accordingly, the Humanitarian Requirement Document (HRD) was revised (Aug 2017), identifying 8.5 million people requiring food aid until the end of the year, an increase from 5.6 million at the beginning of the year. As of June 2017, there are some one million people temporarily displaced in the country mainly as a result of drought and local conflicts, of which, 450,000 have been displaced in 2017. The HRD mid-year review has highlighted the increased risk of disease, malnutrition, gender-based violence and exploitation for children. Consequently, the malnutrition caseload for children under five years of age has been revised upwards with 376,397 children (excluding refugee caseload) expected to be severely malnourished in 2017. Nearly 2 million school-aged children are estimated to be in need of assistance to access education. Ethiopia is the second largest refugee hosting country in Africa with 843,374 registered refugees, 58 per cent of whom are children. It is anticipated that 125,000 additional refugees could arrive from South Sudan by the end of the year.

Humanitarian strategy

2017 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 389,397 children (including 13,000 refugee children) under 5 with SAM, admitted for treatment3
  • 1.55 million caregivers of children, and pregnant and lactating women accessing infant and young child feeding counselling

Health

  • 400,000 people provided with access to essential and life-saving health care services
  • 45,000 people with access to treatment for diarrhoeal disease
  • 68,400 South Sudanese refugee children aged 6 months to 14 years vaccinated against measles
  • 177,485 South Sudanese refugee children vaccinated against polio

WASH

  • 4.39 million people, including 350,000 South Sudanese refugees, provided with access to safe water
  • 2.2 million people reached with key messages on hygiene practices

Child protection

  • 10,000 separated and unaccompanied children (including 7,500 refugee children) receiving appropriate care and protection services
  • 50,000 vulnerable children (including 10,000 refugee children) receiving psychosocial support

Education

  • 622,000 school-aged children, including 188,000 refugees and host community children, accessing quality education (including through temporary structures)

With the increase in humanitarian needs, UNICEF Ethiopia will continue to work with the Government and humanitarian partners to ensure emergency-affected populations are reached with scaled-up interventions in nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and health. As cluster lead in nutrition, WASH and child protection, and co-lead in education, UNICEF Ethiopia will continue to support a coordinated humanitarian response to build the capacity of local structures to reduce vulnerability and build the resilience of communities. In nutrition, UNICEF will expand technical support and continue procurement of therapeutic treatment to ensure malnourished children are identified, referred and access quality nutrition services. Under health, UNICEF will provide life-saving health services through mobile health and nutrition teams, and through the distribution of essential and life-saving supplies for diarrhoea, and vaccines for measles and polio. In WASH, UNICEF will continue to improve access to safe water in drought and other emergency-affected communities and support communities affected by water-borne diseases. Children affected by drought and conflict will have access to quality education in safe environments through the delivery of school supplies, construction of temporary learning spaces and training of teachers. UNICEF will also provide child protection support against separation from family, violence and abuse, including through community-based activities, strengthening of case management systems and cash transfers. In partnership with ARRA, UNHCR and regional bureaus, UNICEF will work to improve access to, and utilization of, basic services for refugees and host communities.

Results to date

As of 31 July 2017, prior to revision, UNICEF Ethiopia’s HAC appeal was 67 per cent funded with US$74.6 million available of the US$110.5 million required to meet the humanitarian needs in the country. Since January, over 141,600 children under five received treatment for SAM provided at 17,600 CMAM sites supported by UNICEF and nutrition partners. Since January 2017, mobile health and nutrition teams have provided 240,813 people with access to medical services and treatment. Of these, 96,325 are children under five years of age. In Somali region, where 87 per cent of the acute watery diarrhoea cases in the country have been reported this year, cases decreased by 88 per cent between April and June 2017, with UNICEF playing a critical role in the response through the provision of technical assistance and medical supplies. Since January, UNICEF has provided treatment for over 39,000 people suffering from diarrhoeal disease. Over 1.8 million people have been provided with access to safe water through water trucking, as well as rehabilitation, maintenance and drilling of new water points, with UNICEF prioritizing areas that are both drought affected and at high risk of water borne diseases. Despite a funding gap in child protection, UNICEF was able to work through the government to provide psychosocial support to over 21,000 children. Critical funding shortages in education have hampered UNICEF’s emergency response and compromised results for out-of-school children. Only 11 per cent of displaced children who had been targeted for education interventions in 2017 have been reached with access to education through the construction of 33 temporary learning spaces in Somali region.

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Funding requirements

In line with the revised inter-agency 2017 Humanitarian Requirement Document issued in August 2017, UNICEF Ethiopia increased its funding appeal to US$135.9 million from US$110.5 million to meet the increased humanitarian needs of children in the country in 2017. Additional funding is critical to meet the urgent nutrition, WASH and health needs of girls, boys, women and men and to avert a larger humanitarian crisis. Continued donor support will ensure that UNICEF provides timely and effective humanitarian response to Ethiopian children and women, but also to refugees in the country.

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1 This figure corresponds to the number of people targeted for WASH as per the 2017 HRD. It is used as the population in need estimation figure, as it is the highest target in the HRD for UNICEF-related sectors.
2 The total number to be reached is calculated using targets for nutrition (389,397 children under 5); health (577,485 people); WASH (4.39 million people); and education (622,000 school-aged children) for a total of 5.9 million people, including 3.1 million children. Note that this total may include double counting as some people may access more than one of UNICEF’s interventions in 2017.
3 In 2017, the total projected under-five SAM caseload is 376,397. The UNICEF target is 389,397 children (including 13,000 refugee children) or 100 per cent of the caseload. UNICEF Ethiopia’s SAM target is covered through the humanitarian programme.