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Map of Southern Africa El Niño/La Niña criris affected countries
UNICEF photo: A group stand around a new tap © UNICEF/2017/E. Mupfumira Children in Zimbabwe use their new UNICEF-provided water source.

Southern Africa

(El Niño and other weather-related events)

In 2017, UNICEF and partners plan for:
152,182

children aged 6 to 59 months treated for SAM

1,432,040

people reached with clean water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

118,607

people having continuing access to HIV prevention, care and treatment information and services

2017 Requirements: US$86,724,600

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Snapshot

Total people in need: 15.6 million1
Total children (<18) in need: 8.5 million

Total people to be reached in 2017: 4.0 million2
Total children to be reached in 2017: 2.2 million

Southern Africa continues to experience the follow–on impacts of the El Niño drought and the La Niña floods. Food insecurity has improved due to better rains and harvests across the region. However, the lingering impact of El Niño and La Niña has contributed further to poor health for children, pockets of high malnutrition in Zimbabwe and southern Madagascar, ongoing school dropout and child protection concerns. The loss of revenue caused by the drought has rendered many vulnerable groups less able to access basic services necessary to facilitate adequate recovery from the impact of the drought. During the cyclone season in March, Cyclone Enawo displaced over 53,000 people in north eastern Madagascar and as a result of La Niña, a national floods disaster was declared in Zimbabwe following heavy rains affecting many districts already impacted by the El Niño drought. Southern Africa has experienced several disease outbreaks in the last six months that include cholera (Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe), typhoid (Malawi and Zimbabwe), diarrhoea (Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique and Swaziland), dysentery (Zimbabwe), plague and malaria (Madagascar). Although access to clean drinking water is improving, millions of vulnerable children in southern Africa still require increased access to safe water along with sanitation and hygiene services. The impact of the drought and floods have resulted in an increase in Gender Based Violence, family separation, migration, and related child protection concerns. Resilience based actions remain critical for mitigating the impact of future droughts and floods in southern Africa.

Humanitarian strategy

2017 programme targets

Lesotho

  • 2,500 children aged 6 to 59 months treated for SAM
  • 17,000 people reached with clean water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 13,107 people reached with information on prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS
  • 52,000 children in humanitarian situations vaccinated against measles

Madagascar

  • 35,125 children aged 6 to 59 months treated for SAM
  • 990,000 people reached with clean water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 25,000 children aged 3 to 18 years in humanitarian situations accessing formal or non-formal basic education

Malawi

  • 64,826 children aged 6 to 59 months treated for SAM
  • 100,000 people have access to water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 8,200 vulnerable households receive an emergency top-up through the social protection system
  • 214,200 children in humanitarian situations vaccinated against measles

Mozambique

  • 27,000 children under age five treated for SAM
  • 145,040 people reached with clean water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

Namibia

  • 6,800 children aged 6 to 59 months treated for SAM or moderate acute malnutrition
  • 180,000 children have access to water (7.5–15 litres per person per day) for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene

Swaziland

  • 1,058 children aged 6 to 59 treated for SAM
  • 50,000 people reached with information on prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS

Zimbabwe

  • 14,873 children 6-59 months treated for SAM
  • 55,500 children, adolescents and pregnant and lactating mothers retained on HIV treatment

The UNICEF humanitarian strategy includes the continuation of provision of life-saving and recovery services to children and women in drought and flood affected countries. UNICEF’s strategy is delivered through sectoral responses in health, nutrition, child protection, education, HIV/AIDS, social protection and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), supported by various communication and community engagement strategies. Through the roll-out of UNICEF’s emergency Preparedness Platform (EPP), UNICEF will undertake periodic risk analysis across southern Africa to further prepare for future shocks and stresses. Through the integration of UNICEF’s Guidance on Risk Informed Programming (GRIP), UNICEF will apply a risk-informed lens to programming in the recovery phase focused on breaking the cycle of recurrent droughts in southern Africa. UNICEF will continue to promote inter-agency implementation of resilience building actions aligned to the UNICEF Regional Office strategy for resilient development and support ongoing inter agency resilience programming. UNICEF will support learning reviews of the El Niño response and integrate recommendations into ongoing and future humanitarian programming.

Results from January to June 2017

As of 30 June 2017, UNICEF had received US$44,298,307 against the original Southern Africa El Niño /La Niña appeal3 of US$ 83,570,000 (53 per cent funded). Due to the increased needs in Angola, a standalone country-specific HAC has been developed. UNICEF has maintained an ongoing response and has continued to deliver life-saving assistance to populations affected by drought, floods and corresponding health-related concerns including cholera. In the last six months, UNICEF has ensured that 69,317 children aged 6 to 59 months affected by SAM have been admitted for treatment and 736,846 children in affected countries have been vaccinated against measles. Nearly 776,000 people are now accessing clean water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene. UNICEF has ensured that 42,419 children in Madagascar, Malawi and Zimbabwe have received appropriate child protection care and services. Over 190,000 children affected by El Niño and La Niña are accessing formal or non-formal basic education. In Lesotho, Swaziland and Zimbabwe, 58,000 children, young people, and women have had access to continued HIV prevention, care and treatment information and services. Building on results achieved in the first half of the year, UNICEF will continue to enhance resilience of women and children.

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Funding requirements

To address the ongoing impacts of the El Niño drought and the La Niña floods including the health-related implications for children, UNICEF’s revised requirement for 2017 is US$86,724,600 of which US$44,298,307 has been gratefully received leaving a funding gap of US$42,426,293 (49 per cent). Without additional funding, UNICEF will be unable to support the multi- sectoral response that includes health and HIV/AIDS, nutrition, child protection, education, social protection, and WASH. Concerted efforts are required through multi-sectoral interventions to assist communities to withstand the ongoing shock and implement effective recovery strategies that contribute to building resilience among the most vulnerable communities.

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1

Total people in need Total children in need 2017
Lesotho 679,436 327,488
Madagascar 1,000,000 532,000
Malawi 6,700,000
3,778,000
Mozambique 2,000,000
1,128,000
Namibia 400,000
190,400
Swaziland 500,000
246,000
Zimbabwe 4,300,000
2,253,200
Total 15,579,436 8,455,888
Report on the RIASCO Action Plan or the El Niño-induced Drought in Southern Africa 2016/2017

2

Total people to be reached in 2017 Total children to be reached in 2017
Lesotho 310,000 113,145
Madagascar 720,000 324,000
Malawi 1,801,300
1,105,000
Mozambique 382,000
164,000
Namibia 201,000
201,000
Swaziland 175,000
74,000
Zimbabwe 450,000
216,000
Total 4,039,300 2,197,145
Source – UNICEF Country Office Sitrep Jan – June 2017, including target revisions

3 Excludes Angola as Angola has separate HAC post July 2017.
4 With the conclusion of the RIASCO Plan of Action in April 2017, many countries did not set cluster targets.
5 Report includes data from 90 out of 175 health facilities.
6 73 per cent funding gap, additional funds required to meet targets.
7 Includes 35,000 people in southern drought affected districts and 125 people targeted for flood.
8 Figures represent children under the age of five years
9 Global Acute Malnutrition prevalence decreased from 3 per cent in 2016 to 2.5 per cent and SAM prevalence decreased to 0.7 per cent (2.5 per cent in 2016). This may contribute to the low number of SAM cases admitted to IMAM clinics for management
10 Measles rubella vaccination and Vitamin A were administered during the supplementary immunization campaign conducted in February March 2017
11 The reduction is based on the under one year of age population in the 20 targeted districts.
12 Incudes measles and rubella. Measles vaccination is 19,868 children. Most outreach activities were affected by the incessant rains between January and April 2017.
13 WASH preliminary activities are underway and are on track for full implementation by the end of 2017.
14 Refers to number of children
15 Data not yet consolidated
16 Includes 720,000 people targeted under drought and 270,000 under floods
17 Includes 203,550 people reached with drought interventions, 199,800 with flood interventions
18 Includes 720,000 people targeted under drought and 270,000 under floods
19 Includes 199,300 people reached with drought interventions and 186,646 people with flood interventions.
20 Low result due to 61 per cent funding gap in WASH
21 2017 Multi Sector Assessment to define the new WASH targets for 2017
22 Based on UNICEF’s results – awaiting cluster results
23 The increase is based on the current scope of drought recovery, typhoid and flood response programmes which will support the drilling, rehabilitation and repair of additional boreholes and piped water schemes targeting over 400,000 people
24 WASH preliminary activities are underway and are on track for full implementation by the end of 2017.
25 Data not yet available
26 Targets revised in July 2017
27 Low result due to funding gap of 80 per cent
28 The increase is based on the current scope of drought recovery typhoid and flood response programmes which will support inter-personal and mass communication health and hygiene promotion programmes targeting over 450,000 people by the end of the year.
29 Targets and results relate to cash transfer
30 Activity yet to begin
31 Awaiting revised targets
32 Awaiting revised targets
33 The reduction is based on the prevailing context. A reduced risk of hazards and shocks vis-à-vis the available funding for the Education response.
34 Emergency funds have yet to be received therefore the previous national target has been reduced to focus specifically on pregnant women living with HIV (PMTCT population), using regular resources.
35 Reported number on young people reached is low since the agreement with Swaziland Red Cross is just being finalized and these will accelerate implementation of HIV prevention programmes in affected area.
36 Activity yet to begin
37 Funding reflects the total requirements
38 WASH, Nutrition and HIV/AIDS, and Child Protection have surpluses while gaps persist for Education, Health and Social Protection
39 HIV activities are supported through regular resource funding
40 UNICEF aims to further support efforts made by the Government of Malawi, to make the social protection system able to scale-up and scale-down in response to a shock and better align humanitarian action and social protection.