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Civil society partnerships

Partnership Cycle

UNICEF Image
© UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0591/Olivier Asselin
A worker from Action Contre la Faim helps a woman lift a UNICEF hygiene kit at a distribution point . The kit was provided by UNICEF. (Cote d'Ivoire)

Introduction

For CSOs, there are two primary ways of working with UNICEF – through Procurement or Partnership agreements. Each has its own operational considerations and requirements. The below table clarifies these two types of relationships:

 Procurement

Through (Institutional Contract)

 Partnership

Through (MoU, SSFA, PCA)

 
  • UNICEF defines scope of work & results to be achieved
  • CSO identified through competitive bidding process
  • CSO hired as Contractor or Service Provider through Institutional Contract or Long Term Agreement (LTA))
 
  • UNICEF and the CSO pool resources to achieve commonly defined results, sharing costs and benefits
  • No set amount for contribution but a key requirement for partnership
  • Partnerships sealed through MoU, SSFA, or PCA
 Modalities can be used concurrently with the same CSO

The type and nature of the service/activity determine the relationship. A decision tree and a table showing whether a partnership or procurement modality is generally used for a particular service can help determine the best type of relationship to pursue.  

 

Procurement

Procurement services steps need to be followed when a CSO is contracted to work with, or on behalf of, UNICEF through a procurement relationship.

Partnership

Depending on the nature of the collaboration, a formal agreement may be appropriate. There are three modalities for such partnerships:

MoU
Memorandum of Understanding

SSFA
Small Scale Funding Agreement

PCA
Programme Cooperation Agreement

  • Non-binding agreement only articulates a common desire to work together
  • Global, regional or national levels to achieve shared objectives
  • No exchange of resources among partners
  • Both parties responsible for monitoring & reporting on results
  • Participatory planning of the programme and implementation strategy
  • Legally binding agreement
  • Defines the expected results and related resource requirements, rights and obligations.
  • Maximum UNICEF commitment of $50,000 in a 12 month period
  • Both parties responsible for monitoring and reporting on results
  • Used mainly for capacity building of national CSOs and advocacy
  • In humanitarian response, used mainly as a tool for immediate response while PCA documents are being finalized
  • In humanitarian response, transfer of resources from UNICEF to a CSO of up to $50,000 in a twelve months period and/or transfer of supplies of up to 3 months
  • Participatory planning of the programme and implementation strategy
  • Legally-binding agreement to define responsibility and protect the rights of each partner
  • Umbrella PCA covering the duration of country programme cycle with a CSO
  • Generally more than $50,000 with no maximum ceiling
  • Required minimum one Programme Document (outlined common programme results through a defined strategy, with shared risks, responsibilities, resources and results) to operationalize 
  • Both parties responsible for resourcing the PCA and monitoring & reporting on results

SSFA and PCA involve four main stages (MoUs require separate guidance):

Key Stages involved in partnership

Stage 1: IDENTIFYING CSO

Stage 2: DESIGNING AND FORMALIZING THE PARTNERSHIP

Stage 3: IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING, REPORTING & AMENDMENTS

Stage 4: CONCLUDING, SUSPENSION, TERMINATION

Partnership during humanitarian response

  
 

Stage 1: Initiating the partnershipStage 2: Designing and implementingStage 3: Monitoring and EvaluationStage 4: Concluding the partnership


 

 

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