The children

UNICEF response to crisis in Ukraine

Partners at work: EU and UNICEF

The Convention on the Rights of the Child

Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS)

 

Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS)

What is MICS?

Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) is an international household survey programme developed by UNICEF in 1990s. The data obtained are used by the States and the international organisations for decision-making for children and women to improve their living conditions.

MICS in Ukraine

In Ukraine, MICS is held for the third time, in cooperation with the State Statistics Service of Ukraine. The survey was held with the financial and technical support of UNICEF, US Agency for International Development (USAID) and Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC).

The current round of MICS in Ukraine has its peculiarities:

  • Standard MICS methodology was complemented with DHS (Demographic and Health survey) elements (e.g. a separate questionnaire for men was introduced).
  • The sampling was done in two stages and covered 12,480 households.

Please click here to find the presentation on MICS methodology.

The data collection took place in September - December 2012in urban and rural areas of all oblasts of Ukraine, including the Autonomous Republic of the Crimea and cities of Kiev and Sevastopol. There were sets of 4 questionnaires: for households, for women, for children under five and for men. The questions on children should be answered either by the mother or by the child’s caregiver. Besides, the households provided salt samples for testing of the iodine contents.

The publication of the MICS Final report is planned for December 2013.

Additional information:
For more information on MICS 2012 in Ukraine, please contact Мariia Matsepa, M&E Specialist, or at 380 44 254 2450.

MICS additional information:

 

 

 

 

Partners

State Statistics Service of Ukraine


US Agency for International Development


Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation


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