UNITE FOR CHILDREN-- UNICEF

Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) 2001–2005

Note: Pages in this section have been stored solely for archiving purposes. Information contained here refers to the 2001–2005 CPAP. Follow this link for current details about UNICEF programmes in Turkey.


Photograph by Rana Mullan © UNICEF Turkey 2004

Protection against the major childhood diseases is free at every local health centre.
Photograph by Rana Mullan
© UNICEF Turkey 2004

Background

Mortality rates for infants and children under-five years of age in Turkey are very high. Poor nutrition and inappropriate care practices in the home tend to be the root cause of many illnesses. Due to poor diagnostic support, limited equipment and supplies and a lack of experienced health practitioners in some areas, sick children are often not properly diagnosed and as a result their parents tend not to be properly advised on how to look after them.

IMCI is currently being tested as a pilot project in two provinces. IMCI promotes a new approach to child health in Turkey that focuses on the overall well-being of the child. It includes both preventative and curative elements which are essential to improve growth and development and to prevent illness, disability and death. IMCI is meant to be implemented by families and communities as well as by health facilities.

IMCI aims:

  • to decrease the IMR to 20‰ live births by 2005;
  • to decrease the U5MR by 50% by 2005;
  • to make IMCI an integral part of childcare practices in families, communities, health facilities and all sectors providing services to families throughout Turkey.

By improving overall health systems, family and community health practices and the care management skills of health personnel, it is expected that IMCI will significantly reduce both the U5MR and IMR and generally improve the health and development of Turkish children.

There is more about IMCI and the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) in Say Yes, February 2002.

IMCI is a global initiative by UNICEF and WHO

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