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Parliament called four Ministers to give evidence at an oversight hearing on implementation of UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

Mr. Mihajlo Manevski, Minister of Justice speaks about the achievements and gaps in the area of justice. On the right Minister of Labour and Social Policy; Minister of Health and Minister of Education and Science

2 November 2010: The Parliamentary Committee on Labour and Social Policy called four portfolio Ministers to give evidence at a oversight hearing on "Implementation of legislation relating to the Rights of the Child and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)." 

The formal legislative oversight hearing, initiated by UNICEF to discuss the findings of a recently published UNICEF supported comparative analysis of domestic legislation and the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child,  was an opportunity for the members of parliament to gather information from the duty bearers themselves and others involved in monitoring child rights

The four Ministers called up to give evidence included: Mr. Mihajlo Manevski, Minister of Justice; Mr. Djejalj Bajrami, Minister of Labour and Social Policy;  Mr. Nikola Todorov, Minister of Education and Science; and, Dr. Bujar Osmani, Minister of Health.  While they all spoke about the achievements in their portfolios, they also highlighted the need for additional efforts to close the equity gaps in the area of health, education, protection and justice.

 “This country has taken impressive steps to improve the protection of children’s rights through changes in law and the adoption of a number of important policy and strategy documents,” said Mr. Sheldon Yett, UNICEF Representative.  “However, some of these laws and strategies have been backed by only limited funding, and as such, enforcement and follow through has often been weaker then the intentions expressed,” continued Mr. Yett.
 
Formal legislative oversight hearings are a relatively new mechanism in this country.  They are used to examine the work of the government and more specifically the implementation by the executive branch of legislative mandates.  Since introducing the mechanism in 2009, the Parliament has held only four oversight hearings.  The hearing dedicated to implementation of legislation and policies as they relate to the Convention on the Rights of the Child focused specifically on the rights of the child in the areas of health, education, labor and social policy and justice.

During the oversight hearing, among other issues, the findings of a recently published UNICEF supported comparative analysis of domestic legislation and the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child were discussed.  The comparative analysis includes a review of over 60 different laws that regulate child rights, over 80 by-laws that derive from these laws, and more than 20 national strategies, action plans and programmes that address the rights of children.  It identifies areas of convergence and divergence, provides selected information on the level of implementation, and makes recommendations to improve the legal framework for children.

The Deputy Ombudsman, Ms. Nevenka Krusarovska also gave evidence, as did Mr. Dragi Zmijanac Executive Director of Megashi; Mr. Zoran Ilieski, Executive Director of the Coalition of Youth Organisations - SEGA; and Dr. Gordan Kalajdziev, one of the authors of the CRC comparative review.

For further information, please contact:
Suzie Pappas Capovska, Communications Officer, UNICEF Skopje, (02) 3231-150 (ext :127),
072  236 725 or spappas@unicef.org

 

 
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