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Although Ishen has a roof over her head and is able to go to school, she is one of the 3.6 million British children living in poverty. To her, poverty means seeing her mother struggle to make ends meet, being unable to go on school trips and feeling excluded by her peers because she is not wearing fashionable clothes and has no money to spend on outings.

Ishen's father left when she was a young child and her mother suffers from osteoarthritis and is too sick to work. While income support from the government allows covers her basic needs, Ishen lives without many of the things that her friends take for granted: she has no washing machine at home and she and her mother often have to think very carefully about meals.

When Ishen's school uniform gets old and shabby, she knows that her mother will find it very difficult to come up with the money needed to purchase a new one. So Ishen holds off for as long as she can, despite the fact that she often feels uncomfortable amidst her better-off peers.

"My friends at school can't understand what I go through because they have not experienced poverty first-hand," says Ishen, "They do not understand that when I say I can't go to the cinema, it is not because I don't want to go, but because I simply can't afford to buy a ticket."

Ishen's plight is clearly not as extreme as that of many children living in developing countries where poverty is often absolute. However, child poverty has many dimensions which are not necessarily captured by the $1 a day measure. Poverty of expectation, of education and stimulus, of time and love and care, may all leave a child deprived in ways that have profound effects in both the short and long term.

Although it is widely assumed that child poverty in rich countries is on a steady downward track that is not the case. In fact, child poverty has risen in 17 of the 24 countries belonging to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.