Unicef Logo and the text: Children Under Threat. The State of The World's Children 2005.

Picture
©UNICEF/HQ03-0160/
Shehzad Noorani
Children caught up in conflict


Children do not start wars, yet they are most vulnerable to their deadly effects. Armed conflict kills and maims children, disrupts their education, denies them access to essential health services, increases poverty, malnutrition and disease. Conflict can also separate children from their parents, or force them to flee their homes, witness atrocities or even perpetrate war crimes themselves. Read more…


In the last decade, the plight of children affected by armed conflict has gained great visibility. While this increased attention to the problems of children in conflict has generally resulted in important advances to better protect them, many of the problems identified then are even graver today – and new challenges have emerged to test the world’s resolve to protect its children. Read more…


UNICEF and its partner agencies are dedicating a large proportion of their resources to addressing the social and economic inequalities that can lead to violence, emphasizing outreach to vulnerable groups – including girls, rural communities and the poor – combating marginalization, defusing tensions and promoting effective social integration. Read more…

Also in this section
Interview
Picture

story
Picture

Story
Picture

Story
Picture

Story
Picture




UNICEF’s work on child protection [Web]

Adult Wars, Child Soldiers [PDF]

Children, Armed Conflict and HIV/AIDS [PDF]

No Guns, Please: We are Children! [PDF]

“... to me, a world fit for children is when everyone begins to find the child in them. I am a child...everyone has definitely been children before... a child sees no colour, race or religion! … if the world was like a child... that world would definitely be a wonderful place to live, a place fit for all humanity to live!!...”
girl, 16, Malaysia

Log on to www.unicef.org/voy


Estimated number of children killed in conflicts since 1990: 1.6 million.

Estimated rise in the under-five mortality rate during a 'typical' five-year war: 13 per cent.

0
© UNICEF 2004