The State of the World's Children 2004

Education for all

International Consultative Forum on Education for All, 'Education for All: Achieving the goal, final report', Mid-decade Meeting of the International Consultative Forum on Education for All, UNESCO, Amman, Jordan, 1996.
This document assesses mid-decade progress towards meeting the Education for All goals. It includes statistics, descriptions of coalitions and resources mobilized to advance Education for All, selected transcripts from the mid-decade meeting and a list of participants.
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Regional Office for Education in the Arab States, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, ‘Education for All – the Year 2000 Assessment: Regional report on Education for All in the Arab States’, UNESCO, Beirut, 2000.
This is an evaluation of the drive for Education for All in the Arab States. It includes assessments of early childhood care, basic education, primary education expenditures and efficiency, teacher competencies, literacy rates, basic skills acquisition and enrolment rates, with a particular focus on equality and the gender gap.
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United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 'Monitoring Report on Education for All', UNESCO, Paris, 2001.
The Education for All Monitoring Reports measure progress towards the goal of universal basic education for all children, young people and adults. The 2001 document – the first in this series of annual reports – establishes baseline data for future comparisons, highlights important trends and partnerships, and suggests strategies for reform. It also outlines structures for implementing the Dakar Framework, a list of commitments adopted at the 2000 World Education Forum. Statistical tables are included.
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United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 'Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2002: Is the world on track?', UNESCO, Paris, 2002.
The 2002 Global Monitoring Report charts progress on basic education for all children against the goals established at the 2000 World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal. Major themes include the relationship between Education for All and development, resource requirements for implementing Education for All, international aid, data collection and the Dakar goals and strategies for planning future action. Statistical tables are also included.
[External Web page]

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2003/4: Gender and Education for All – The leap to equality, UNESCO, Paris, 2003.
The 2003/4 Global Monitoring Report documents global gender inequalities in education and assesses progress towards Education for All in light of the Millennium Development Goal of gender parity in education by 2005. The report includes good practices, strategies for action and statistical tables.

World Conference on Education for All, ‘World Declaration on Education for All and Framework for Action to Meet Basic Learning Needs’, UNESCO, Paris, 1990.
The two statements were adopted by leaders at the 1990 World Conference on Education for All at Jomtien, Thailand. The World Declaration describes the mandate and vision of the Education for All movement, while the Framework for Action identifies goals, targets and areas for priority action.
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World Education Forum, ‘The Dakar Framework for Action, Education for All: Meeting our collective commitments’, UNESCO, Paris, 2000.
The Dakar Framework for Action was adopted at the 2000 World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal, reaffirming the vision of the World Conference on Education for All and establishing further international commitments. The document identifies achievements since 1990, new challenges and practical strategies, as well as six regional frameworks for action.
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World Education Forum, ‘Education for All 2000 Assessment – Thematic Studies: Girls’ education’, UNESCO, Paris, 2001.
One of 14 thematic studies on Education for All available online examines the global gender gap in education and its roots in pervasive gender discrimination. Major themes include progress in girls’ education since 1990, lessons learned, new challenges, including the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and priority areas such as access to education and resource mobilization.
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