The State of the World's Children 2000

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Maps

Map 5: Rich world, poor world

For a higher resolution, zoomable version of this map, please see the PDF file.
Maps were revised after publication of The State of the World's Children 2000.

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF

Debt
Total external debt as a percentage of GNP
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF200% and over
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF100%-199%
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF50%-99%
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF20%-49%
Copyright© 1999 UNICEFUnder 20%
Copyright© 1999 UNICEFNo data
Developing world average: 35%
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF
Sources: UNICEF, The Progress of Nations 1999; UNICEF, The State of the World's Children 2000, table 6; World Bank
Debt increases and decreases
External debt of developing countries as a percentage of GNP by region

Source: UNICEF, The Progress of Nations 1999.

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF

Child poverty in industrialized countries
Percentages of children who are likely to be living in a poor family (defined by a household disposable income less than half of the country's overall median income)

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF

Source: B. Bradbury and M. Jäntti, Child Poverty Across Industrialized Nations, Innocenti Occasional Papers, Economic and Social Policy Series, No. 71, UNICEF International Child Development Centre, September, 1999

This map does not reflect a position by UNICEF on the legal status of any country or territory or the delimitation of any frontiers. Dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the parties.
A child's prospect for survival and development depend on where she or he is born.
  • The well-being of children is profoundly affected by a country's external debt as monies used to repay loans are unavailable for health, education and other basic social services.
  • Almost 30% of the population in poor countries live on less than $1 a day - the majority of the poor are women and children.
  • But child poverty is not confined to developing countries. Although poverty is measured on a different scale in the industrialized world, more than 1 in every 10 children in some of the richest nations are raised in families living below the established poverty line.

General Notes

Map 5. Rich world, poor world: Poverty is measured differently in developing and industrialized nations. In developing countries, the international poverty line is less than $1 a day and the lack of access to basic social services is assumed. In industrialized countries, different criteria apply.

 
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