The State of the World's Children 2000

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Maps

Map 4: Children and adolescents at special risk

For a higher resolution, zoomable version of this map, please see the PDF file.
Maps were revised after publication of The State of the World's Children 2000.

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF

Child risk measure
1998 index based on five indicators: under-five mortality; children not attending primary school; percentages of children moderately or severely underweight; risk from armed conflict; HIV/AIDS prevalence
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF60 or more high risk
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF40-59
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF20-39
Copyright© 1999 UNICEFUnder 20 low risk
Copyright© 1999 UNICEFNo data
World average: 30
Copyright© 1999 UNICEF
Sources: UNICEF, The Progress of Nations 1999; ILO; UNICEF, Ther Progress of Nations 1998
Immunization
Percentages of one-year-olds fully immunized against DPT and measles 1997-98 percentages in selected countries

Source: UNICEF, The State of the World's Children 2000

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF

Copyright© 1999 UNICEF
This map does not reflect a position by UNICEF on the legal status of any country or territory or the delimitation of any frontiers. Dotted line represents approximately the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by the parties.
Under the Convention on the Rights of the Child, children and adolescents at risk have the right to special protection.
  • The child risk measure highlights countries where children face the highest risks to their lives.
  • Where adult HIV/AIDS prevalence rates are high, children risk losing the protection and support of one or both parents.
  • Some 250 million children in developing countries work, many in hazardous and exploitative labour. Their most basic rights, their health and even their lives are jeopardy.
  • One third of all births are not registered, increasing the likelihood that these children may be denied access to basic services and miss out on health care and education.
  • Many children still die from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines.

General Notes

Map 4. Children and adolescents at special risk: The child risk measure (CRM) is a new indicator used for the first time in The Progress of Nations 1999, in an attempt to capture in numbers some of the risks a child faces until the age of 18. Higher numbers represent greater risk. The CRM was designed as a composite of five factors which have great impact on a child's well-being: under-five mortality rate, per cent of children moderately or severely underweight, per cent of primary-school-age children not attending school, likelihood of risk from armed conflict and from HIV/AIDS.

 
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