20 Years - The Convention on the Rights of the Child

 

State of the World's Children Report

Photo Panels: Progress on Survival and Development Rights

Child survival
The annual number of global under-five deaths has dropped from 12.5 million in 1990 to less than 9 million in 2008.
 
Exclusive breastfeeding
for infants less than six months old has increased in all but one developing region.
 
Micronutrient supplementation
fully protecting children in developing regions with two doses of vitamin A has risen from 16% to 62% since 1999.
 
Routine immunization
of three doses of DPT3 vaccine has increased from 75% in 1990 to 81% in 2007.
 
Vaccines
save millions of lives and have helped reduce global measles deaths by 74% since 2000.
 
Malaria prevention
Use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets for under-fives has risen sharply in sub-Saharan Africa since 2000.
 
HIV prevalence
has declined among women aged 15-24 attending antenatal clinics since 2000, in 14 of 17 countries with sufficient data to determine trends.
 
HIV treatment
for children under 15 has risen dramatically, most significantly in sub-Saharan Africa.
 
Improved drinking water
More than 1.6 billion people have gained access to improved drinking-water sources between 1990 and 2006.
 
Primary school enrolment
The number of children out of school declined from 115 million in 2002 to 101 million in 2007.
 
Primary school completion
Survival to the last primary grade for children in developing countries was more than 90% in 2000-2007 according to international survey data.
 
Gender parity in primary education
is improving, with the gender parity index at 96% or higher in most developing regions.
 
 

Panels

The Convention’s evolution, progress achieved on child rights, challenges remaining, and actions to be taken to ensure that its promise becomes a reality for all children are looked at closely in a series of panels in the report, available in a single PDF as well as in separate PDF’s.



Photo Panels

Key facts demonstrating the progress achieved on child rights and the challenges remaining are presented in a series of photo panels.