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A REPORT CARD ON WATER AND SANITATION: NUMBER 5, SEPTEMBER 2006 View Previous Editions>

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Progress for Children: A Report Card on Water and Sanitation, Number 5, September 2006, focuses on progress towards Millennium Development Goal 7, specifically its 2015 targets of reducing by half the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

The complete text, maps, charts and graphs of the report are available in PDF, both as one single file and in parts.

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Downloadable maps, charts and graphs

Global trends towards the MDG water and sanitation targets.

More than 1 billion people are without access to improved drinking-water sources.

Regional trends towards the MDG water target.

Regional trends towards the MDG sanitation target.

About 2.6 billion people are without access to improved sanitation facilities.

Access to improved drinking-water sources, 2004.

Access to improved sanitation facilities, 2004.

Map: The world is on track to meet the MDG water target.
Map: The world has made insufficient progress towards the MDG sanitation target.

Coverage of improved drinking-water sources is less than 50 per cent in five countries of West/Central Africa.

Burkina Faso, Liberia and Niger have the largest urban-rural disparities in access to improved sanitation facilities in West/Central Africa.

Urban-rural disparities in access to improved drinking-water sources are higher in Eastern/Southern Africa than in any other region.

Madagascar, Malawi and Mozambique made the largest gains in providing access to improved sanitation facilities in Eastern/Southern Africa, 1990–2004.

In rural areas of Djibouti, Iraq and Morocco, coverage of improved drinking-water sources is less than 60 per cent.

Egypt, Morocco and the Syrian Arab Republic had the largest increases in access to improved sanitation facilities in the Middle East/North Africa, 1990–2004.

India and Nepal have already met the MDG target on water, and Pakistan has virtually achieved it.

Urban-rural disparities in access to improved sanitation facilities in South Asia are the largest in the world.

Mongolia and Papua New Guinea have the largest urban-rural disparities in access to improved drinking-water sources in East Asia/Pacific.

China, Myanmar and Viet Nam had the largest increases in the region in access to improved sanitation facilities, 1990–2004.

Brazil, Chile and Paraguay have achieved universal or near universal coverage of improved drinking-water sources in urban areas, but coverage in rural areas remains low.

Urban-rural disparities in access to improved sanitation facilities remain a challenge in countries of Latin America/Caribbean.

Central Asian countries have some of the largest urban-rural disparities in access to improved drinking-water sources in CEE/CIS.

Coverage of improved sanitation facilities is less than two thirds in rural areas of nine CEE/CIS countries.