A GOOD START IN LIFE

UNICEF wants all children to celebrate their fifth birthdays. And this is an achievable goal. To reach it, we promote the basics:
immunization, malaria prevention, polio eradication, vitamin A, iodized salt, and clean water and better hygiene and sanitation.
We train health workers so communities who cannot afford a medical professional can take care of their basic health needs.

 

VOICES FROM THE FIELD
BENIN
‘EQUITY CHAMPIONS’ PROVIDE HEALTH CARE TO THE MOST VULNERABLE

Marie, a housewife from the southern village of Ikpinlè, says,
“The Community Health Workers are really helpful, and they play
an important part in our life. Ernestine is in charge of my
neighbourhood. She has been visiting us since my 4-year-old
grandson was born, and I really appreciate her dedication. Now, I
do not have to run to the hospital each time the boy is not feeling
well. She knows what to do. In addition, she gives me good
advice on the cleanliness of my household, how to cook healthy
food, and how to use insecticide-treated bed nets to protect
against malaria.”

 

 

 

 

Last year, we helped communities to treat more than
1.9 MILLION
MALNOURISHED
CHILDREN

under 5 in more than 65 countries.

BENIN CHILD SURVIVAL PROGRAMME (2012)


TOTAL: $4.3 MILLION

$2.2 MILLION
Regular Resources, 52%
$1.9 MILLION
Other Resources Regular, 43%
$0.2 MILLION
Other Resources Emergency, 5%

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL FOR EVERY GIRL AND BOY

Half of all children don’t have early learning opportunities, and children
in the poorest countries suffer from lack of schooling the most.

VOICES FROM THE FIELD

MALDIVES
PROVIDING ALL CHILDREN WITH
INCLUSIVE AND QUALITY EDUCATION

“If I didn’t go to school, my life would be very lonely,” says
Mohammad, who studies at Jamaaluddin School in Male’, and
who is the only deaf-mute member of a large, boisterous family.
“At home, my brothers used to get annoyed with me when I was
younger, but now I play football with them. My elder sister loves
me and talks to me the most, but my mother can’t really
understand my language,” he says with a smile. While he is
fortunate to have a happy home life, it is at school that
Mohammad feels “completely at ease” – as a top student, as a
member of the deaf community, and, most importantly, as just
another teenager hanging out with his friends.

 

 

 

 

IN LIBYA,
in 2012, UNICEF helped the
Ministry of Education assess the country’s
4,800 SCHOOLS,
which had been severely affected by the 2011 uprising.


MALDIVES EDUCATION PROGRAMME (2012)



TOTAL: $0.29 MILLION

$0.15 MILLION
Regular Resources, 51%
$0.14 MILLION
Other Resources Regular, 49%

 

 

 

 

AN AIDS-FREE GENERATION

AIDS is the world’s fifth leading disease-related cause of death and the leading cause of death
among women of childbearing age. AIDS is also a contributor to under-5 mortality.

 

VOICES FROM THE FIELD
CHAD
IMPROVING HIV/AIDS SERVICES FOR
CHILDREN AND THEIR MOTHERS


After Merci lost her husband and daughter to AIDS and it was
discovered that she and her son were also HIV-positive, she was
referred to the UN ICE F-supported Djenandoum Naasson
Centre. “The centre changed my life,” she said. “It offered me and
my eldest son treatment including free antiretroviral therapy,
medical and nutritional care and psychosocial support.” As a
result of her care, Merci was able to return to university, where
she studied rural development, and she took the initiative to found
CAP I (Centre d’appui aux personnes infectées) – a support
centre for people living with HIV.

 

 

 


IN SWAZILAND,
UNICEF helped more children get treatment
to prevent HIV and AIDS.
By the end of the year,
67% OF CHILDREN
UNDER THE
AGE OF 15

were receiving antiretroviral treatment.

CHAD HIV/AIDS PROGRAMME (2012)


TOTAL: $1.84 MILLION

$1.25 MILLION
Regular Resources, 67.9%
$0.43 MILLION
Other Resources Regular, 23.6%
$0.16 MILLION
Other Resources Emergency, 8.5%

 

 

 

 

FREEDOM FROM HARM

Each day, millions of children worldwide – from all backgrounds,
and across all religions and cultures – experience violence, exploitation and abuse.

 

VOICES FROM THE FIELD

TAJIKISTAN
MAKING DUSHANBE CITY SAFER AND
FRIENDLIER FOR CHILDREN AND WOMEN

“I was really happy that Ms. Sanobar Rakhimova, Deputy Mayor
of Dushanbe, listened to me attentively and replied to my
concerns,” said Khusravi, a beneficiary of a project to aid children
living on the street. “I really believe such people can make a
difference for the children in Dushanbe, and I hope there will be
more opportunities like this.” Indeed, Khusravi’s dream will be
coming true: Ms. Rakhimova says she found the consultations
with children so useful that there will be similar events in the
future on a regular basis.

 


Protecting children begins with a
BIRTH CERTIFICATE.
UNICEF helped
29.5 MILLION
children be registered in
82 COUNTRIES.
IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO
alone about
351,000 CHILDREN
were registered in 2012.

TAJIKISTAN CHILD PROTECTION
PROGRAMME (2012)




TOTAL: $1 MILLION

$0.45 MILLION
Regular Resources, 45%
$0.55 MILLION
Other Resources Regular, 55%