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Paediatric HIV and AIDS Treatment

© UNICEF/NEP2921/SaShrestha

Nepal does not currently have national data on paediatric care and treatment, as indicators have yet to be incorporated into the national health management information system. However, the number of known HIV positive children has risen from 19 in 2000 to 536 children in November 2007. Under the assumption
that 30–40 per cent of children require anti-retroviral therapy, then somewhere between 200 and 280 children need treatment. Currently, only 68 children are receiving this life-saving therapy in Nepal.

Activities

• Ensure that HIV-exposed and infected infants receive cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in five health facilities, by identifying children through counselling and testing, training healthcare providers, producing informative materials, and procuring test kits and drugs.
• Ensure that children in five health facilities receive anti-retroviral combination therapy, by identifying HIV positive children through counselling and testing, training healthcare providers, producing informative materials, and procuring test kits and drugs.
• Ensure that at least 20 per cent of HIV positive children in five districts receive anti-retroviral therapy, by identifying HIV positive children through counselling and testing, training healthcare providers, producing informative materials, and procuring test kits and drugs.
• Ensure emergency buffer stocks of paediatric anti-retroviral and postexposure prophylaxis kits are available.

Expected results

By 2010, five districts of Nepal will have fully functioning HIV treatment mechanisms that incorporate paediatric AIDS cases. This will result in all infants and children, identified during prevention of mother-to-child transmission
Counselling and testing at health facilities, receiving appropriate treatment in accordance with nationally approved treatment protocols (or WHO/UNAIDS standards). In addition, it will mean that at least 20 per cent of children in need of anti-retroviral therapy will be identified either at health facilities or through community-based maternal and neonatal health initiatives, and will receive appropriate therapy and follow up.

As Nepal is prone to emergencies such as flooding and earthquakes, emergency buffer stocks of paediatric anti-retroviral and post-exposure prophylaxis kits will be available for continued treatment of identified children.

 

 

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