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Nutrition

© UNICEF/NEP1203/PMathema

Improving the nutritional status of children and women has been recognised as a top priority by the government. Nepal has already achieved the targets for controlling vitamin A deficiency and reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in children. It is currently on track for achieving sustainable elimination of iodine deficiency disorders.

One of the targets of the Millennium Development Goals is to reduce the level of malnutrition from 60 per cent to 30 per cent. However, almost 50 per cent of children are still stunted (2006 DHS).

Activities

• Ensure that community health workers and volunteers have the skills to implement micronutrient deficiency control programmes, through training and development of manuals and guidelines.
• Ensure that micronutrient supplements and adequately iodised salt are being utilised by families, through training for health workers and Female Community Health Volunteers, strengthening of logistic management system, and social marketing and awareness campaigns.
• Introduce the use of micronutrient-rich sprinkles for infants and children aged 6–24 months in two districts, and support national scale up.
• Improve caregivers’ knowledge on infant and young child feeding through behaviour change communication using mass media and through meetings, training and community-based promotional activities.
• Ensure that 50 per cent of severely malnourished children have access to community-based therapeutic care in 10 districts, by training health facility and community health workers, and developing a logistic management system.

Expected results

By 2010, at least 80 per cent of health workers and Female Community Health Volunteers will have skills to effectively implement micronutrient deficiency control nationally. Families will be utilising micronutrient supplements and adequately iodised salt appropriately. The use of micronutrient-rich sprinkles for infants and children aged 6–24 months will have been piloted in two districts.

Disadvantaged and excluded parents/caregivers will have enhanced knowledge and skills for improved child nutrition, and access to high-quality nutritional services. Communities in Community Action Process settlements will participate in discussions on improved feeding and care practices to reduce malnutrition. At least 75 per cent of caregivers in 15 districts will have improved knowledge of infant and young child feeding practices. Some 50 per cent of severely malnourished children will have access to community-based therapeutic care in 10 districts.

 

 

For every child
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