Overview

Country profile

About UNICEF Moldova

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Country profile

   Moldova is a small Eastern European country, slightly larger than Belgium. Bordering the European Union, Moldova is located between Romania and Ukraine. 

   The county gained its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.  It is home to some 3.5 million people; over 20% are under 18 years.  An additional half million people, including over 100,000 children, live in the breakaway region of Transnistria.  The country sees itself as part of Europe; though the country still has far to go to create the living conditions and opportunities for its children that are norm in the region.

   The population of Moldova is largely rural; 65% of all children live in villages, where services are fewer and poverty much more common than in the cities Family and national income remains low:  in per person terms, about the same as Bolivia.  Employment is scarce and greater opportunities elsewhere beckon:  Moldova has one of the highest rates of migration in the world, and children often remain at home with relatives.

   General statistics about Moldova paint a somewhat encouraging picture, with a modestly growing economy and poverty in slow but steady decline.  These benefits though do not reach all, and children are often last in line.  Overall, about one quarter of Moldovans live in poverty; but this rate rises quickly for children in rural areas, from large families, or living in single parent households. Half of Moldovan children are raised on less than 2.5 dollars per day.

   Daily features of a child’s life are an interesting mix of old and new:  cell phones are common everywhere, and one in three in people use the internet.  Meanwhile, only five percent of rural families with children have inside toilets, and even running water is a rarity, enjoyed by less than one in four such families. 

   Differences between village and city life are especially apparent in the winter, when unpaved roads turn to mud or ice, and poor indoor heating as well outdoor sanitary facilities create additional hardship.

   Despite these challenges, Moldova is committed to change. UNICEF works hand in hand with Government, communities, civil society and, of course, children to help create a brighter future.  Our work focuses on:

  • Health and nutrition
  • Education
  • Child Protection
  • Social Policy and Advocacy

KEY DATA AND STATISTICS*

 

GENERAL INFORMATIONi

 

Population as of 1 January 2014

Persons / percentage

Total population

3,557,634

Children under 18

699,849

% of total population

19.7

Children under 5

194,464

% of total population

5.5

New born children (2013)

37,871

Population living below poverty line (2013)

Percentage

Total population

12.7

Urban

4.6

Rural

18.8

Households with 1 child

10.4

Households with 2 children

12.7

Households with 3 and more children

34.6

Use of improved drinking water and sanitation

(2012 Moldova MICS)

Percentage

Improved drinking water

86.4

Urban

95.5

Rural

80.9

Improved sanitation

69.7

Urban

84.5

Rural

60.8

 

HEALTHii AND NUTRITIONiii

 

Child and maternal health

 

Mortality Rates (2013)

Rate

Infant mortality rate, per 1,000 live births

9.4

Urban

10.0

Rural

9.2

Under-five mortality rate, per 1,000 live births

11.9

Urban

11.2

Rural

12.0

Maternal mortality rate, per 100,000 live births

15.8

Urban

-

Rural

24.9

Nutrition(2012 Moldova MICS)

Percentage

Children under 6 months exclusively breastfeed

36

Children under 5years old suffering from mild to moderate anemia

21

Women aged 15-49 suffering from mild to moderate anemia

26

Stunted children under 5 years old

6

Richest 20% households

3

Poorest 20% households

11

Overweight children under 5 years old

5

Richest 20% households

7

Poorest 20% households

3

Household population using iodized salt

44

Richest 20% households

68

Poorest 20% households

23

Urban

61

Rural

34

 

   *excluding Transnistrian region, except where indicated

 

HIV/AIDSiv

 

HIV incidence and prevalence (2013)

 

New cases of HIV

Cases

Moldova - total

706

Incidence per 100,000 population

Incidence

Moldova - total

18.0

Excluding Transnistrian region

13.7

Transnistrian region

46.9

Mother to child transmission, %

Percentage

Moldova - total

2.0

 

EDUCATION v

 

Net enrollment (2013/2014), %

Percentage

Preschool (age 3-6)

81.6

Urban

101.5

Rural

70.1

Primary (grades I-IV, age 7-10)

87.1

Urban

100.0

Rural

79.7

Lower Secondary (grades V-IX, age 11-15)

82.6

Urban

92.3

Rural

77.4

 

 

 

CHILD PROTECTIONvi

 

Children deprived of parental care (2012)

Number of children

Children in residential care

4,889

With disabilities

2,881

Children in family type care

9,168

Guardian care

8,498

Foster care

670

In-country (domestic) adoptions  (2013)

87

Children with disabilities (2013)

13,349

0-6 years old

3,085

7-17 years old

10,264

Children and Migration (2012)

Percentage

Children with at least one biological parents abroad

 21

Urban

17

Rural

23

Both biological parents are abroad

5

Child Labor (2009)

Percentage

Children aged 5-17 considered as child laborers

 18.3

5-11years old

 14.1

12-14years old

 20.3

Juvenile justice (2013)

Persons / percentage

Charged with an offence(crime)

1,551

Sentenced

320

Detained in closed facilities (prisons)

43

Share of crimes committed by juveniles, %

3.0

 

I Source: National Bureau of Statistic, 2012 Moldova MICS

II Source: Ministry of Health, National Bureau of Statistics,TransMonEE

III Source: 2012 Moldova MICS

IV Source: GARP Progress Report on HIV/SIDA

Source: National Bureau of Statistics, Ministry of Education

VI Source: TransMonEE, National Bureau of Statistics 

 

 

 

 

Key statistics:

Population on 1 January 2014 3,557,634
Children under  18 years old 699,849 19.7%
Children under  5 years old 194,464
5,5%
Children born (2013) 37,871
Infant mortality rate, per 1,000 live births 9,4
Under-five mortality rate, per 1,000 live births 11,9
Children with at least one biological parents abroad 21%


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