Life skills

HIV prevention, care and support

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© UNICEF/ HQ01-0150/ Pirozzi
Posters on HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention taped on the wall behind him, an instructor uses a flip chart during a training session for peer educators at the NGO ‘Kindlimuka’, an association of people living with HIV/AIDS in Maputo, Mozambique.

In the most affected countries, HIV/AIDS is debilitating not only health, but social, economic and cultural systems. Its symptoms are clearly felt throughout the education sector, affecting both the capacity to supply schooling services and demand on the current formal system. The net impact is impaired quality and equality of education, particularly where teachers are affected by family trauma or AIDS-related illness themselves, where families lose purchasing power, and where fewer resources are available to support services and infrastructure.

One of our key defenses against the spread and impact of HIV and AIDS is to ensure access to free and compulsory primary education of good quality, particularly for girls. And learning to prevent and cope with HIV/AIDS must be considered part of that quality education. Curricula must respond to learners' needs for knowledge, attitudes and life skills to avoid high-risk sexual behaviour and manage in a world with AIDS.

HIV/AIDS prevention programs that have balanced knowledge, attitudes and skills related to HIV transmission have proven more effective in actually changing behaviour than those that have focused on information alone. Skills-based programs have proven more effective in delaying the age of first sexual intercourse, and increasing safe sex behaviour among sexually active youth (e.g., increasing use of condoms, reducing number of sexual partners).

To help you apply life skills-based education to HIV/AIDS prevention, a Powerpoint slide show presentation and a corresponding set of Hand-outs and Talking points have been developed for your use. The slide show can be used to increase your own expertise or to advocate for the implementation of a skills-based approach to HIV/AIDS prevention. The talking points elaborate on the slides and can be used as hand-outs. Download Adobe Acrobat Reader to view the talking points.

Also see "Technical and Policy Documents" under the Resource section of this site for more information and documentation on HIV/AIDS.

Documents

Life Skills Powerpoint Presentation with talking points
[powerpoint]

Hand-outs and Talking points
[PDF]

Preventing HIV/AIDS, STI and Related Discrimination: An important responsibility of Health-Promoting Schools. WHO, 1999.

 


[PDF]

Preventing HIV/AIDS, STI and Related Discrimination: An important responsibility of Health-Promoting Schools. WHO, 1999. (french)
[PDF]



Documents

Life Skills Powerpoint Presentation with talking points
[powerpoint]

Hand-outs and Talking points
[PDF]

Preventing HIV/AIDS, STI and Related Discrimination: An important responsibility of Health-Promoting Schools. WHO, 1999.

 


[PDF]

Preventing HIV/AIDS, STI and Related Discrimination: An important responsibility of Health-Promoting Schools. WHO, 1999. (french)
[PDF]



 

 

A special case for HIV prevention, care and support

Comprehensive education sector approaches can contribute to HIV prevention, care and support, especially in countries with generalized epidemics and high education participation rates.

A special case for HIV prevention care and support

Girls, HIV and Education

Three key lines of action in the educational response to HIV prevention, care and support with particular emphasis on girls:

1. Getting girls into school
2. Providing gender-sensitive life skills-based HIV education in school
3. Ensuring special measures for those not in school

Girls, HIV/AIDS and Education

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