The children

Early years

Primary school year

Adolescence

 

Primary school year

Girls participate in a crafts session at the community centre Shatila, a camp for Palestinian refugees in a suburb of Beirut.
© UNICEF/Lebanon/2005/LeMoyne
Girls participate in a crafts session at the community centre at Shatila, a camp for Palestinian refugees in a suburb of Beirut, the capital.

Universal access to basic education and primary education is one of the most important goals of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and A World Fit for Children agenda.

 Education is vital in combating poverty, empowering women, protecting children from hazardous and exploitative labour and sexual exploitation, promoting human rights and democracy, protecting the environment, and influencing population growth. 

 Regional imbalance and disparities

According to the Multi Indicators Cluster Survey 3 (MICS 3), while 88.5 per cent of children of primary school entry age (6 years) in Lebanon attend first grade of primary school, there are significant differences between regions. In Beirut, 100 per cent of children go to primary school, only 83.5 per cent attend in the North Districts (excluding Akkar and Minieh – Dinnieh). 

Gender balance – how girls and boys fair in education
There are no significant differences between boys and girl. Across Lebanon, percentage of transition from intermediate to secondary school is 96.7 per cent, with no significant gender differentials; 96.1 per cent for girls and 97.3 per cent for boys. 

Transition to secondary education

Transitioning rates from primary into secondary education in the various regions range between 90.7 per cent in Beirut and 100 per cent in Mount Lebanon (except Suburbs of Beirut). 

 Child labour prevalence

The prevalence of child labour among children aged 5-14 years is 1.9 per cent, with 2.7 per cent of boys and 0.9 per cent involved.

 Physical punishment widespread

In Lebanon, 81.9 per cent of children aged 2-14 years are subjected to at least one form of psychological or physical punishment by their mothers/caretakers or other household members. More importantly, 13 per cent of children are subjected to severe physical punishment. This affects younger children more.

For more information, please have a look to the Central Administration of Statistics website.  



 


 

 
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