Sport for development

England’s bowler Stuart Broad visits UNICEF project at Barbados primary school

UNICEF Image
© UNICEF Eastern Caribbean/2007/Dabney
England cricket team member Stuart Broad speaks with children at Hillaby Turner’s Hall Primary School in Barbados.

By Robert Dabney and Lisa McClean-Trotman

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, 13 April 2007 – Students participating in the Hillaby Turner’s Hall Primary School Positive Lifestyle Cricket Fest were recently given a special treat. One of the English cricket team’s fast bowlers, Stuart Broad, took part in their inter-school cricket competition.

The appearance by Mr. Broad, 20, was part of a series of outreach visits being organized as part of the partnership between the International Cricket Council (ICC), UNICEF, UNAIDS and the Caribbean Broadcast Media Partnership on HIV/AIDS to focus on children and AIDS during the ICC Cricket World Cup 2007. 

During his visit, Mr. Broad took the opportunity to practice bowling and catching with the children and showed them how to improve their batting techniques.

Sports and child development

“Sports can be of massive importance in helping in the development of children,” he said after the event. “I was delighted to have a chance to spend some time with the children, talking to them one-on-one about building for their futures and avoiding the temptations and pitfalls that are out there. 

“These kids really have a passion for the sport, and it can be very important in keeping them headed in the right direction,” Mr. Stuart added.

UNICEF Image
© UNICEF Eastern Caribbean/2007/Dabney
Stuart Broad teaches the fine art of spin bowling to Jared, 5, during the English cricketer’s visit to Hillaby Turner’s Hall Primary School.

Hillaby Turner’s Hall Primary School is one of the schools in the eastern Caribbean where UNICEF will be supporting the development of peaceful co-existence models. The Positive Lifestyle Cricket Fest, supported by UNICEF, also featured a motivational talk to the students by former West Indies cricketer Sherwin Campbell and coaching tips from another former member of the West Indies team, Vasper Drakes.

‘Positive, healthy lifestyles’

School Principal Karen Best said she was extremely pleased by the cricketers’ involvement and believed their presence would help to boost the talent of young potential West Indian players.

“The West Indies will need good young cricketers with strong values and of good character,” Ms. Best told the students. “The presence of Mr. Broad and the former Barbadian cricketers here today is as an example of how hard work, determination and dedication can pay off.”

UNICEF Representative for Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean Tom Olsen stressed the importance of working with primary schools in the region in order to advance sports for positive development.

“UNICEF is working to ensure that every child in the Caribbean is equipped with the tools to make good decisions that will lead to positive, healthy lifestyles,” said Mr. Olsen. “These tools include having high self-esteem, respecting self and others, having discipline and self-confidence. All of which are important in HIV prevention, as well as addressing other social ills confronting children and adolescents.”

The Cricket Fest ended with the appearance of Mello, the ICC Cricket World Cup 2007 mascot, who also entertained the schoolchildren.


 

 

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