Child Protection

Overview - Child Protection

Our response - Child Protection

 

Overview - Birth Registration for all

© UNICEF/IDSA/025/Wunderman
A UNICEF birth registration campaign poster visualizes that 6 out of 10 under-five years old babies in Indonesia do not have legal identities.

Birth registration is a fundamental human right and an essential means of protecting a child’s right to their identity. Registering a birth serves as an effective civil mechanism that legally acknowledges a person’s existence, enables a child to possess a birth certificate, establishes the child’s family ties, and tracks life’s major milestones from birth through marriage and death. Birth registration also helps governments to track their country’s demographic statistics, health trends and differentials. Comprehensive data means more accurate planning and implementation of development policies and programs, particularly in the fields of health, education, housing, water, sanitation and employment.
In Indonesia, however, birth registration isn’t sufficiently prioritized by the government or by society at large. The greatest obstacle to implementing the Articles of the 2002 Child Protection Law that calls for free, compulsory birth registration, is the lack of a comprehensive civil registration system in Indonesia. Approximately 60 per cent of Indonesian children under-five years of age do not have birth certificates, and half are not registered anywhere. This represents one of the lowest birth registration levels of any country in the region.

"Approximately 60 per cent of Indonesian children under five years of age do not have birth certificates, and half are not registered anywhere...This leads to rampant falsification of identity and age, and a risk of future exploitation."

In addition to the lack of comprehensive birth registration, bureaucratic hurdles and an over-centralized system have led to public apathy towards registering children. In many cases, middlemen take advantage and profit from the civil registration mechanism. Consequently, instead of a free service people end up paying a third party anywhere from Rp100,000 to Rp800,000 (about $10 to $80) for this basic task, a tremendous financial burden for most Indonesian families. The situation further leads to rampant falsification of identity and age, and a risk of future exploitation. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate government demographic data often leads to mistaken implementation of health and education programs, among other problems.

(Read about UNICEF's response for Birth Registration)

 

 
Search:

 Email this article

unite for children