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Water supply back to full capacity in typhoon-devastated Tacloban

International donors, aid agencies and Philippines government get life-saving clean water back on tap

Tacloban/Manila/New York 17 November 2013 - At least 200,000 people affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippine city of Tacloban and six surrounding districts are now receiving clean water for cooking and drinking, as the first water treatment plant came back to full operating capacity last night.

Since Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines just over a week ago, the water treatment plant for Leyte district was only operating at one-fifth of its normal capacity, leaving survivors of the storm vulnerable to disease and sickness.

Critical negotiations involving UNICEF, the Philippine armed forces and USAID have resulted in an initial emergency supply of fuel from the Philippines military to run the plant for four days, with USAID pledging to maintain the supply of required fuel on an ongoing basis. 

"It's critical that we provide at least 15 litres of clean drinking water per day for each individual if we are to prevent diarrhea and other water borne diseases,” said UNICEF Representative in the Philippines Tomoo Hozumi. 

“What we have seen today is vital collaboration between government, donors and UN agencies that will literally save lives. Because of these efforts, hundreds of thousands of people will now have sufficient clean water to meet their basic needs for cooking, cleaning and good hygiene."

Full operation of the water treatment plant will restore access to chlorinated water to 30,000 water connections. The increase of volume from 15,000 cubic litres to now 60,000 cubic litres also means shorter queues at public taps.

In the last 48 hours, UNICEF has been trucking and airlifting water and sanitation supplies to Tacloban and other affected areas including Roxas, in an ongoing effort to restore clean water supplies, and reduce the threat of diseases caused by poor sanitation and contaminated water.

The next steps will be to repair water distribution lines and provide water in the harder to reach areas. 

 

For more information:

Zafrin Chowdhury, UNICEF Philippines, Tel +632 901 01 77, Mobile: +63 917 867 8366, zafrinchowdhury@gmail.com

Kent Page, UNICEF Philippines, Tel  +63-929-768-2367, Tel: +1-917-302-1735 kpage@unicef.org

Chris de Bono, Regional Adviser, in Manila, Mobile: +63 929 768 2367, cdebono@unicef.org

Marge Francia, UNICEF Philippines, Tel: +632 901 01 73, Mobile: +62 917 858 9447, mfrancia@unicef.org

Marixie Mercado, UNICEF Geneva, Mobile: +41 79 756 7703, mmercado@unicef.org

Kate Donovan, UNICEF New York, Tel: + 1 212 326 7452, Mobile: +1 917 378 2128, kdonovan@unicef.org

 

 

 

 

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