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School children in Andhra Pradesh launch UNICEF assisted campaign of self-expression on HIV /AIDS

© UNICEF/ India/Sandeep Biswas
TRIVENI High School, Champapet-Hyderabad(Andhra Pradesh):Deepa a student from Medak District demonstrates her work on HIV/AIDS awareness at the students exhibition

By Radhika Srivastava and Vikas Verma

August 2005 - In Southern India’s state of Andhra Pradesh, with one-tenth of the country’s HIV positive people, a vigorous campaign was recently launched to get children to express themselves freely on HIV/AIDS and related subjects. The objective was to get them to break the taboo on talking about safe sex.

With an HIV prevalence rate of about 2.25 per cent, Andhra Pradesh clearly has something to worry about. UNICEF has been a partner with the state government that has taken many positive measures in the past few years to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS.
The month-long campaign involved about 46,000 high school students from twenty-three districts who participated in various competitions aimed at generating awareness on HIV/AIDS by tapping into their creative potential.The project with the school children was started to help children protect themselves. Fully supported by UNICEF in partnership with the state government, it has been launched for 1.3 million school students who are being helped by their 24,000 teachers. The campaign on self-expression is the latest initiative to strengthen and enliven the project with school children. The month-long campaign involved about 46,000 high school students from twenty-three districts who participated in various competitions aimed at generating awareness on HIV/AIDS by tapping into their creative potential. These students are now ready to pass on this awareness to their families and to the community and feel quite upbeat about it.

Deepa, a student from Medak district, for instance, made a model with plastic toy trucks and a thermocol highway that explains the transmission of the virus among truck drivers, a known high-risk group. She also displayed various methods used to test HIV and objects that could potentially transmit the diseases such as barber’s blades, syringes, shaving blades, etc. As she explained her “display” to a group of students from another school, she said, “I want to put this up at village fairs and exhibitions. I want to tell people about HIV.” Her face shone with earnestness as she spoke.

The event began first at the divisional level and moved to the districts before reaching the state capital city of Hyderabad. This programme was a special feature of the state-wide initiative called AASHA (Aids Awareness and Sustained Holistic Action) launched by the government in July.

In a state where people are known to shy away from discussing HIV/AIDS, the campaign has made the atmosphere lighter for discussion. The Triveni High School in Hyderabad played host to students from across the state who converged in the capital to participate in different competitions, all related to HIV/AIDS.

© UNICEF/ India/Sandeep Biswas
TRIVENI High School, Champapet-Hyderabad(Andhra Pradesh):Students from the school gather to see school teacher Mr.C H.Shyam Kumar demonstrate his work for the HIV/AIDS awareness teachers exhibition

As the campaign and children’s competitions picked up pace, confident and smiling young faces emerged from classrooms ready to compete with and outshine students from other schools. They were all banking on their understanding of HIV/AIDS to do so. Inside the school auditorium, several teams sat on the stage answering difficult questions posed by the quiz master. Questions ranged from basics such as “do mosquitoes transmit HIV?” to complex ones on anti-retroviral drugs. Children answered these with ease and came out with flying colours.
“The serpent is the HIV/AIDS menace ready to gobble our planet. The missiles are ‘condoms use’, ‘faithfulness to your life partner’ and ‘abstinence’. With these three missiles, we will be able to destroy the serpent” In another hall, students put up charts and models to spread awareness in the community.  In yet another room, Shivalingam, a lean, class X student stood proudly next to his display that won him the first prize. His chart showed a deadly serpent holding the earth between his jaws. From another corner of the chart, three missiles headed towards this serpent. He explained, “The serpent is the HIV/AIDS menace ready to gobble our planet. The missiles are ‘condoms use’, ‘faithfulness to your life partner’ and ‘abstinence’. With these three missiles, we will be able to destroy the serpent,” he explained to eager listeners. Maturity and confidence rested with ease on his shoulders as Shivalingam explained his display to visitor after visitor.

Teachers, too, from across the state had gathered to display their teaching material on HIV/AIDS. Among the most innovative teachers was C. Syam Kumar from East Godavari, a district known to be among the hardest hit in the state. He used simple “tricks” to explain the subject. He ran a lit cigarette-lighter through a cotton handkerchief that did not burn. “This is how HIV can spread silently through our community and we would not even know,” he said. His audiences were mesmerized.

Kumar said he had held his display in 100 villages in the district. “Since I use some tricks, my shows are very popular. After the shows I always have people asking me more about HIV/AIDS,” he said. The one-man team has been campaigning for HIV/AIDS in the district.

Even at the host school, Kumar’s table was popular with students and teachers  alike who flocked around asking him to show his tricks. His audience were not just children but also officials as senior as the Director of the School Council for Education Research and Training, K. Anand Kishore who applauded along with the others. “When we started this programme a month ago, we were not sure how it would be perceived since there was the assumption that parents did not want their children to talk of HIV/AIDS. But the response was mind-blowing. There was tremendous enthusiasm from parents and students and we are determined to hold many more similar events in the future,” said Mr. Kishore.

If the enthusiasm of children, teachers and officials is anything to go by, the HIV awareness graph in the state is clearly set to a rapid climb.

 

 

 

 

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