Immunization

Introduction

A young boy looks at his arm after vaccination
© © UNICEF/NYHQ2013-0569/Aziz
A boy receives a measles vaccination in a UNICEF immunization tent in the Kawrgosk camp for Syrian refugees

Immunization saves up to 3 million children each year.

Vaccines keep children alive and healthy by protecting them against disease.  Immunization is especially important for the hardest to reach families as it can also be a bridge to other life-saving care for mothers and children in isolated communities – such as child nutritional screening, anti-malarial mosquito nets, vitamin A supplements and de-worming tablets. Immunization is one of the most successful and cost-effective public health investments we can make for future generations.

Vaccines are protecting more children than ever before. But, in 2012, nearly one in five infants  –22.6 million children – missed out on the basic vaccines they need to stay healthy. Low immunization levels compromise gains in all other areas of health for mothers and children. The poorest, most vulnerable children who need immunization the most continue to be the least likely to get it.

Almost one third of deaths among children under 5 are preventable by vaccine. UNICEF and its partners are working to change these numbers and ensure that the lives of all children are successfully protected with vaccines. But, if immunization is not prioritized, the most marginalized children will not get vaccines, which could mean the difference between life and death.


 

 

 

 Email this article

 Printer friendly

GAVI Alliance

New enhanced search