Activities

Child Survival

Learning and Development

Child Protection

Adolescent Development and Participation

Water Sanitation and Hygiene

 

Child Protection

Birth Registration

Birth registration is the official recording of the birth of a child by a state administrative process. A birth certificate makes children visible, by ensuring a permanent and official record of a child’s existence and is fundamental to the realization of children’s rights and practical needs.

Securing children’s right to an identity and a nationality will allow children to get a passport, open a bank account, obtain credit, vote and find employment. It also helps to ensure access to basic services, including immunization, health care and school enrolment.

Birth registration is also essential in protection efforts, including: preventing child labour by enforcing minimum-employment-age laws; ensuring that children in contact with the law are not treated (legally and practically) as adults; shielding children from underage military service or conscription; countering child marriage and reducing trafficking. 

Birth Registration


Juvenile Justice

Preventing contact with the law is a crucial element of any juvenile justice policy. Investing in preventing children from coming into contact with the law, through the provision of adequate human, financial and institutional resources, and strong policies and partnerships at all levels for enforcement (including with parents, children, media, government, civil society and development partners) is essential to the protection of children's rights. The provision of quality social services, including Health and Family Life Education, and programmes which support protection, health and adolescent development, will empower children and reduce their vulnerability when coming into contact with the law whether as perpetrators, victims or witnesses.

Juvenile Justice


Violence

All Children have the right to be protected from violence exploitation and abuse!

Protecting Children is everyone’s responsibility. Violence against children includes emotional and physical abuse, neglect or negligent behaviour, sexual abuse and exploitation. It is often practiced by someone known to the child, including parents, other family members, caretakers, teachers, employers, and other children. Generally, only a small proportion of acts of violence, exploitation and abuse are reported and investigated, and few perpetrators are held accountable.

Children in Guyana are exposed to various forms of violence, exploitation and abuse, including sexual abuse and exploitation, armed violence, trafficking, child labour, gang violence, physically and emotionally violent child discipline, and other harmful practices.

Violence



Violence against Children

Suriname has one of the highest prevalence of violence against children among Caribbean countries. According to MICS 2010, 86.1% of children aged 2-14 nationally and 91.2% in the interior have been subjected to any form of violence, and around 12% of children experienced severe physical discipline.

Suicide is a leading cause of death in Suriname. The number of registered suicides in Suriname has greatly increased from 6.2 per 100,000 population in 1965

to 26.7 per 100,000 in 2012; far beyond the world average of 16 per 100,000 inhabitants. The average age people commit suicide in Suriname is 37 years. For women, the majority of suicides were registered in the age group 15-19 years. In the last few years there is also an increase of children aged 10-14 that attempt to commit suicide. Trauma or abuse is one of the risk factors causing suicide, and the estimates of prevalence and incidence of domestic violence and other forms of violence against children and intimate partner violence in Suriname are worrisome.

Violence against Children 

 

 
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