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Evaluation report

1998 Sudan: Girls' Education in Displaced Camps in Khartoum State



Author: Al-Fanar Center for Development Studies

Executive summary

Background

NGOs, foundations and international NGOs have undertaken considerable interventions in the displaced camps. Despite the high level of NGOs support to the displaced community in the four camps, problems pertaining to: the availability of and access to medical and educational services, nutritional status, sanitation and hygiene are evident. UNICEF Emergency Education Programme stepped in to provide, improve and increase access to educational facilities for displaced children in the Sudan. The programme is designed to develop a model to support the Ministry of Education and community organization education services for long term effects.

Purpose / Objective

The main objectives of this assessment survey are to find out the reasons that constrain girls' enrollment and continuity for basic education in the official four camps of the displaced persons in greater Khartoum with reference to socio-cultural and economic factors; propose solutions to help build infrastructure in order to enhance girls' involvement and continuity in education; at least basic education, propose strategies to be followed to plan and implement successful and sustainable educational opportunities for displaced girls and define the role to be played by the different parties involved/to be involved in promoting girls' education in displaced camps.

Methodology

Interviews were conducted with eleven of the school principals, class tutors and First, Second and Third grade pupils of basic schools in displaced camps. Questionnaires targeted children of school age both enrolled in basic schools and those out of school. 69 children from 11 schools out of 36 supported by UNICEF were surveyed. The number of children surveyed represents 10% of the total population of the schools supported by UNICEF. Observation at schools focused on condition of schools, availability of educational materials and ages of students compared to classes they attend. Observation at households meant to find out how much domestic work the girl students are to do at home and to assess the general living conditions of the families of concern. Secondary data was gathered from previous studies, reports and papers that dealt with the subject.

Key Findings and Conclusions

There are no available statistics as to the number of school-age children at the four camps. It is estimated that only 36.6% of school-age children are enrolled in school. At present, the number of basic schools in the four camps is 36 with 12, 900 children; girls constitute only 27.3%.

Despite the relatively diverse ethnic origins of the population studied, it is witnessed that cultural restriction on the mobility of girls prevents them from continuing their education after reaching puberty, or other community values which lead to beliefs such as educating girls makes them unfit for the work expected of them after marriage. 2.9% of those surveyed stated that their families made them stay at home to do domestic work. 2.9% stated that they were made to leave school to get married. 88.4% stated that their parents would like them to attend school. 51.6% stated that their families cannot afford to pay school fees.

A number of UN agencies, international NGOs, Sudanese churches, Islamic NGOs and foundation and national NGOs have considerable interventions in the displaced camps. Despite the high level of NGO support to the displaced community in the four camps, problems pertaining to the availability of and access to medical and educational services, nutritional status, sanitation and hygiene are evident.

Recommendations

Dropping school fees would secure enrollment and continuation of a considerable number of girls in education.

Continuation and expansion of the existing feeding programmes are essential to secure girls' enrollment and continuation in education.

Coordination between various actors involved in the provision of educational facilities for the displaced is highly recommended.

Initiation and carrying out of appropriate strategies that secure opportunities of simultaneously earning and learning is highly recommended.

Empowering local communities to play a lead role in advocacy programmes aiming at combating constraining factors to girls' education is of vital importance.

Encouraging schools to take positive and encouraging measures to limit and discourage drop out may prove of value. Follow up and home visits may be adopted.



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Report information

Date:
1998

Region:
MENA

Country:
Sudan

Type:
Study

Theme:
Education - Girls

Partners:

PIDB:

Follow Up:

Language:
English

Sequence Number:
1998/800

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