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Mozambique, 26 May 2014: Interview with Rahimatha Habiba about the child-to-child radio programme in Namialo

Interview with Rahimatha Habiba about the child-to-child radio programme in Namialo
© UNICEF/MOZA2014-00002/Dulce Nhacuongue
"I joined the C2C radio programme after witnessing many injustices occurring to children in my community," said child-to-child radio programme producer Rahimatha Habiba.

26 May 2014, NAMPULA, Mozambique Rahimatha Saíde Habiba, is only 11-years old, but she is already working as a child-to-child (C2C) radio programme producer at Namialo community radio station, in Nampula province. She told us about how her program helps raise awareness in her community.

Question: What motivated you to join the C2C radio programme?
Rahimatha Habiba (RH): I joined the C2C radio programme after witnessing many injustices occurring to children in my community. I saw children living in the streets, young girls who dropped-out of school to get married, and parents who sold their daughters to older men. All these children’s rights violations have motivated me to join hands with other children producing radio programmes to help raise awareness of children’s rights, through peer-to-peer communication.

Q: Why is the programme important?
RH: The C2C radio programme is an important initiative as it helps raise awareness on children’s rights. Parents need to know that children have the right to an education, to an opinion, to play, and that no girl should be married before the age of 18. They need to know that children need to grow in a loving and caring environment and protected from any kind of violence and abuse.
The programme addresses many other issues for our community, for example, that people have the right to speak their own language, follow their tradition and religion, even if they belong to a minority group, they must be respected. For example, I’m a Muslim and a few months ago one of my school teachers was not so comfortable that I wore a headscarf but slowly he started to accept it. I believe it’s partly due to our radio programme. 
The programme also provides a good opportunity for children to discuss many issues with their parents, siblings and friends.

Q: Does your family listen to the radio programme?

RH: At home, I spend most of my time with my father as my mom travels frequently due to her work. I enjoy listening to the radio programme with my father, as he provides useful feedback and tips on how better to address the topic in discussion, and I enjoy that very much because it helps me to improve my skills as a radio producer.

Q: Do you have any extra activities or hobbies?
RH: I like helping with our house chores, and looking after my 2 younger siblings. 
In my free time I usually study and practice drawings of outfits. When I grow up I want to be a journalist or a fashion designer.

Q: Do you have any message to your community and listeners?
RH: I think that the first step to improve children’s rights in Mozambique is to reduce adult illiteracy. Both children and adults should be equally sensitized on child rights. Those adults who missed the opportunity to go to school when they were young should go back to school and learn more on child rights. It’s never late to learn something.

For more information, please contact:

Gabriel Pereira, UNICEF Mozambique, 
Tel. (+258) 21 481 100; Email: maputo@unicef.org

 

 

 
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