Media centre

Introduction

Press releases

Features

Official statements

Fact sheets

Q&As and Commentaries

Blogs

Photo stories

The OneMinutesJr

Videos

Celebrities

Contact information

 

Impact of the Economic Crisis on Children

As the economic crisis hit East Asia and the Pacific, tugging further down a region already beleaguered by the weight of increased food and fuel prices, the UNICEF East Asia and Pacific Regional Office stepped up the impetus for social protection relief by assembling an influential gathering of analysts, academics and high-ranking government officials. It was the beginning of what has become a push for greater frontline monitoring of social impacts of the crisis and child-sensitive responses.

After the three-day conference in Singapore, both UNICEF EAPRO and Country Offices have fanned the momentum to keep children on the agenda across East Asia and the Pacific through national consultations, advocacy, policy support, assistance for real-time monitoring and surveillance, and regional and country-level partnerships to leverage action. 

The background papers from that conference, in addition to a few others, have now been published in a special edition of the academic journal Global Social Policy which has just been released. The link to the electronic version of this edition of the journal is available on this site. In addition, the EAPRO Social Policy and Economic Analysis Section has produced a brief six-month update report entitled Impact of the Global Economic Crisis on Children in East Asia and the Pacific: A Mid-Year Update on UNICEF Policy and Programme Responses, which chronicles the aforementioned government and UNICEF responses to the crisis as well as providing a snapshot of the evolving impacts of the different crises.

As economic conditions appear to have stopped worsening, continued efforts are required to help governments act to protect children. By providing a database of evidence, it is hoped that this website will assist such advocacy in persuading governments of the feasibility and effectiveness of taking further action that helps deliver results for children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact us

For more information, please contact:
Samman J. Thapa


Search:

 Email this article

unite for children