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Adolescent development and participation

Adolescent is an age of opportunity for children and a pivotal time for us to build on their development in the first decade of their life, to help them navigate risks and vulnerabilities and to set them on a path to fulfill their potential.


The East Asia and Pacific Region is home to 329 million individuals aged 10-19, over 25% of the world’s adolescent population. The adolescent experience is diverse across countries in this region. They face a range of challenges and vulnerabilities but they also have unique contributions to make to their communities and countries.

Children and young people who are well-informed, educated, self-confident and are involved in decisions are better able to protect themselves against mental health problems, health problems including HIV, human trafficking, exploitation and other challenges confronting our region. UNICEF supports programmes that encourage adolescent development and participation, including:
• Supporting governments to collect disaggregated data on young people, especially most vulnerable young people
• Encouraging and supporting governments to develop effective and sustainable youth policy
• Encouraging children and adolescent’s representation in local government bodies and in policy making processes.
• Responding to gender-based inequalities and vulnerabilities
• Implementing the Child-Friendly School Framework, which focuses on child-centered learning methods and child-friendly environments;
• Supporting student associations and councils, after-school clubs and child-run media;
• Developing the capacity of young people, especially in life skills, leadership, health and HIV/AIDS;
• Developing the capacity of policy-makers and programmers to work effectively to address adolescent needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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