International day of persons with disabilities

© UNICEF 2012

December 3, 2016 – he theme for this year’s International Day is “Achieving 17 Goals for the Future We Want”. This theme notes the recent adoption of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the role of these goals in building a more inclusive and equitable world for persons with disabilities.

Since 1992, the annual observance of the International Day of Disabled Persons aims to promote an understanding of disability issues and mobilize support for the dignity, rights and well-being of persons with disabilities. It also seeks to increase awareness of gains to be derived from the integration of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life.

Observance of the 2016 IDPD coincides with the 10-year anniversary of the adoption of the CRPD – one of the most quickly and widely ratified international treaties put forth by the United Nations to date. The Day will take stock of progress since the Convention’s adoption in 2006 and will reflect on the 166 ratifications it has earned thus far. Events at the IDPD 2016 will emphasize efforts toward universal ratification of the CRPD, ideas for the continued advancement of the goals of the convention, and reflection on the challenges that remain toward the full realization of the CRPD’s goals.

To learn more about the International Day of Persons with Disabilities and how to commemorate it, please visit UN enable website 

UNICEF Image: Blind young boy from India holding a mic, smiling
© UNICEF/NYHQ2014-0740/Markisz
Kartik Sawhney addresses the audience at the UNICEF Activate Talk on “Youth with Disabilities and Innovation: Making the World Inclusive for ALL!

Inspirational Innovators

Here are just some of the inspirational innovators who are using technology to help children with disabilities fulfill their rights.

Kartik Sawhney

Technology is not only designed and created for people with disabilities, it is designed and created by people with disabilities. Kartik Sawhney was born in New Delhi and was blind from birth. As a student in mainstream schools, Sawhney became aware of his mother’s tremendous effort to ensure that his school materials were transcribed into braille. As a result, he turned to the computer to assist him with his studies.

More on this topic please read in 

UNICEF blog posted by Rosangela Berman Bieler, Chief of the Disability Section, UNICEF 




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