Convention on the Rights of the Child

What you can do

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UNICEF, government authorities and relief groups support education for children in Sudan.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child has been used around the world to promote and protect children’s rights. In the years since its adoption the world has seen significant advances in the fulfilment of children’s rights to survival, health and education through the provision of essential goods and services, and a growing recognition of the need to create a protective environment to shield children from exploitation, abuse and violence.

However there is still much to be done to create a world fit for children. Progress has been uneven, with some countries lagging considerably behind others in giving child rights its deserved prominence on national agendas. And in several regions and countries some of the gains appear in danger of reversal from threats like poverty, armed conflict and HIV/AIDS.

Every one of us has a role to play in ensuring that every child enjoys a childhood. If you are a parent, teacher, social worker or other professional working with children, raise awareness of the Convention on the Rights of the Child among children. If you are a member or employee of an organization working for children’s rights, raise awareness of the Convention and its Optional Protocols, research and document governmental actions and policies and involve communities in promoting and protecting children’s rights. If you are a member of the media, promote knowledge and understanding of children’s rights and provide a forum for children’s participation in society. If you are a parliamentarian, ensure that all existing and new legislation and judicial practice is compatible with your country’s international obligations, monitor governments’ actions, policies and budgets and involve the communityincluding childrenin relevant decisionmaking.

Everyone can participate in respecting, protecting and fulfilling children’s rights. And UNICEF can help. Whoever you are and wherever you are, contact your local UNICEF office or National Committee to see what you can do.


 

 

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