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Day One - OneMinutesJr workshop on health issues starts in Astana

© UNICEF / Chris Schuepp / 2008
Participants Nastya (right) and Sascha (left) listening to the presentation given by the UNICEF Health Officer.

They come from Pavlodar, Almaty, Shimkent, Koshketau and Kyzl-Orda and some of them have travelled for more than 30 hours (!!!) on trains to make it to the capital Astana for this first-ever OneMinutesJr workshop in Kazakhstan. Distances do not mean much in the 9th biggest country of the world, but now the 20 participants sit shoulder to shoulder in the workshop room and introduce themselves to each other.

The topic of this hands-on video workshop is health issues and the task is to produce 20 films over the course of the next five days, all about health and all from the children's very personal perspectives. Later this year, in October, Kazakhstan will host an international conference supported by UNICEF, WHO and the Kazakh Government to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Alma Ata Declaration on Primary Health Care that has been signed by 146 countries to date.

The videos, developed, filmed and edited by the children (aged 12 to 19) with the help of a small team of international trainers, will be used to visually highlight the children's views at the conference in Almaty (formerly Alma Ata).

© UNICEF / Chris Schuepp / 2008
Participants Nastya (right) and Sascha (left) listening to the presentation given by the UNICEF Health Officer.

At the start of the workshop, the trainers show videos from prior workshops held in other Russian-speaking countries (Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan) so the young participants find it easier to understand and to relate to what they see on the screen. Some of them have limited camera experience already and the way they analyze what they like or dislike about the other films shows that they are ready to start doing their own films.

But first, they get a professional introduction to the health issues by Aliya Kosbayeva, the UNICEF National Officer for Health and Nutrition in Kazakhstan. Aliya breaks the ice immediately and involves the children in a lively discussion about what health means to them.

In the afternoon, the participants start developing their story ideas. Not surprisingly in Central Asia, many of the films will be centered around topics like HIV/AIDS and drugs.

Astana, Kazakhstan - July 21, 2008 - Chris Schuepp

 

 
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