Media centre

Introduction

Latest news

Publications

Calendar

Ethical Guidelines

Contact information

 

Measles immunization campaign targets over 620,000 young people in Tashkent

A boy receives routine immunization - Uzbekistan, 2004
© UNICEF/SWZK00224/ THOMAS KELLY
Uzbekistan, 2004. A boy receives routine immunization at a local clinic in Tashkent, the capital.

TASHKENT, 15 December 2006 - More than 620,000 young people in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, are to be vaccinated against measles and rubella in a mass immunization campaign that starts today and runs until 25 December. The young people, aged 10 to 29 will be vaccinated free of charge, regardless of their previous immunization status. The campaign is being carried out by Ministry of Health of Uzbekistan, in collaboration with UNICEF and USAID.

“Immunization is essential for people, and especially children, to realize their right to the highest attainable standard of health. And it is also an affordable means of protecting whole communities against measles,” said UNICEF Representative in Uzbekistan, Reza Hossaini.

The combined measles-rubella vaccine also protects against congenital rubella syndrome.

Young people will be vaccinated at health facilities, schools, colleges, universities and institutes, mahallas, bazaars and other fixed sites in the city. More than a 1,000 medical workers are being mobilized for the campaign, following training by the Ministry of Health.
UNICEF has been working with local partners to spread the word among parents and caregivers to ensure that every eligible children is vaccinated. This has included communication and social mobilization through the mass media, door-to-door visits to parents and caregivers and support from prominent youth figures.

The 750,000 doses of measles-rubella vaccine needed for Tashkent City, together with syringes, were purchased and donated by USAID. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recruited a team of local epidemiologists to monitor the campaign for safety and effectiveness.
Note for editors:

The economic arguments for investing in measles are compelling. Of all health interventions, measles immunization carries the highest health return for the money spent, saving more lives per unit cost. The measles-rubella vaccine, which has been available for more than 30 years, cost around 800 uzbek soums (0.65 USD) per dose, including safe injection equipment.

***

About UNICEF
For 60 years UNICEF has been the world’s leader for children, working on the ground in 156 countries and territories to help children survive and thrive, from early childhood through adolescence.  The world’s largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS.  UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.


For additional information, please contact:

Tursunova Dilorom Alimovna,
Leading Specialist on immunoprophylaxis, Ministry of Health of Uzbekistan.
Tel.: 139 47 21

UNICEF Office in Uzbekistan, Tel.: 133 95 12, 132 08 61

Shukhrat Rakhimjanov, Officer, Health Program,
Email: srakhimdjanov@unicef.org

Umud Hudaikulov, Assistant Project Officer, Expanded Programme on Immunization,
Email: uhudaikulov@unicef.org

 

 

 

 

 

Related links

More on immunization campaign

www.privivka.uz (Russian)


Search:

 Email this article

unite for children