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Poverty and Exclusion in CEE/CIS

Photo gallery

 
UNICEF/SWZK00509/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Georgia 2004: A child begging on the streets of the capital, Tblisi.


UNICEF/SWZK00847/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Albania 2004: Tirana, the capital. Brothers Iliaz (left) and Rambo (right) at the UNICEF-assisted Don Bosco Vocational Training Centre.

 
UNICEF/SWZK00858/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Albania 2004: Children eat lunch at the UNICEF-assisted Day Centre of FBSH (Children of the World and Albania) in Bregu I Lumit, on the edge of the capital, Tirana. The centre, seeks support the integration needs of vulnerable children such as the Roma into mainstream schools. It offers preparatory classes, recreation activities, and a lunch-time meal. A social worker and psychologist work with families and children to help them to overcome obstacles that prevent the children from realizing their educational rights.


UNICEF/SWZK00879/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Albania 2004:  A boy looks for recyclable materials in a garbage dump in Bregu I Lumit on the outskirts of the capital, Tirana.


UNICEF/SWZK00447/ DONATA LODI
Armenia 2005: Sureu, age 13, lives in the ‘container’ district in Gyumri, capital of Shirak district in northwest Armenia. Sureu is a child considered 'at risk.' He usually attends lessons and activities after school at the Shirak Centre, a UNICEF-supported local NGO. He is not there today, because, he says, he has some urgent things to do for his father. Here, the ruins from a 1988 earthquake remain – these were intended as temporary barracks for construction workers charged with repairing and restoring the area. The collapse of the Soviet Union forced the work to end and today, the barracks and surrounding ruins house displaced and poor families. This area has the highest poverty rates in Armenia, with 75 per cent of the population living below the poverty line.

 
UNICEF/SWZK00350/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Azerbaijan 2004:  At the UNICEF-assisted Drop-in Centre for street children in the capital, Baku In self-reflection, twelve-year old Anar considers a future as a globe-trekking photographer. The centre provides psychosocial recovery and rehabilitation for street children by organising sport activities and professional training programmes to help children reintegrate into society. The incidence of street children is still fairly new in Azerbaijan and has risen ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Deteriorating economic and social conditions have forced many families into poverty, leaving many children to live and work on the streets. Figures on the number of street children in the country vary according to the season, making solid data hard to acquire.

 
UNICEF/SWZK00581/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Moldova 2004: Four-year-old Sammy with his grandmother at home in their village of Zamesti, Cahul District, southern Moldova. Sammy and his brother Edgar live with their grandmother, as their parents migrate to other areas in search of work. Many children in Moldovan villages have been left behind by parents who must migrate in order to find decent work and earn money for their families. An estimated 600,000 people have left the country – about one-seventh of the entire population. Migration to neighbouring countries and to Western Europe, legally or clandestinely, is now commonplace.


UNICEF/SWZK00519/ GIACOMO PIROZZI
Moldova 2004: A girl sells flowers on the streets of the capital, Chisinau.

 
UNICEF/SWZK00254/MACCAK
Serbia and Montenegro: A Roma girl


UNICEF/SWZK00204/ SEMA HOSTA
Turkey , August 2004: A girl in Kars, in the east of the country.

 

 

 

 

Intergovernmental Conference of Children in Europe and Central Asia


Palencia Regional Consultation


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