Resources

Publications

Background documents

Facts and statistics

Annual Reports

Cambodia Country Kit 2011-2015

Knowledge Digest

E-Library

 

Cambodia Country Kit 2011-2015

© UNICEF Cambodia

In eight booklets, the Cambodia country kit describes the UNICEF programme of cooperation with the Royal Government of Cambodia 2011-2015.

Used together or individually, the booklets explain how UNICEF aims to enhance the capacity of the government to deliver basic services for children and women. 

Each booklet is available for download in pdf.


OVERVIEW:
Cambodia is a country of contrasts, with the nation's rise and fall signified by its twin tourist attractions: the centuries-old Angkor Wat temples and the Killing Fields, which have come to symbolize a period in which an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians died between 1975 and 1979.

CHILD PROTECTION:
Children from poor families in Cambodia are highly vulnerable, often facing daily threats to their health, education, safety and overall development. Every day in Cambodia, children are exposed to abuse, violence, exploitation and neglect.

EDUCATION:
More children in Cambodia are entering school and the gender gap is quickly closing as more girls make their way to the classroom. In the 2010/2011 school year, the overall rate of children enrolled in primary school was 95.2% (95.8% for boys and 94.6% for girls),

HIV AND AIDS:
Cambodia has made substantial progress in preventing and mitigating the impact of HIV and AIDS, receiving a prestigious award at the Millennium Development Goal summit in September 2010. This has been achieved through targeted prevention programmes that

LOCAL GOVERNANCE FOR CHILD RIGHTS:
More than 30 years after the brual Khmer Rouge regime shattered Cambodia, the government is taking meaningful steps toward democratic development in an effort to be more responsive to citizens' needs, the majority of whom live in rural areas, struggling to satisfy basic needs for their families.

MATERNAL, NEWBORN AND CHILD HEALTH AND NUTRITION:
Between 2000 and 2010, Cambodia has made significant progress in improving the health of its children. The infant mortality rate has declined from 95 to 45 deaths per 1,000 live births, setting Cambodia on track to reach its MDG 4 to reduce child mortality.

POLICY, ADVOCACY AND COMMUNICATION:
Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in realising children's rights to health, education, social protection and gender equality in Cambodia. As a result, some of Cambodia's MDGs are on track. However, multiple challenges hinder the efforts to achieve these goals with equity.

WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE:
Lack of water and sanitation is one of the biggest issues affecting the health of children across Cambodia, particularly those who live in the countryside. Too many children are still denied the most basic rights to safe water, the dignity of using a toilet and the simple practice of washing hands with soap.

 

 
Search:

 Email this article

unite for children