Map of the State of Palestine
UNICEF photo: 8-year-old Ahmed Al Ansari stands amid the remnants of his family’s home, which was destroyed by Israeli airstrikes, in the city of Khan Yunis, in the southern Gaza Strip. © UNICEF/NYHQ2012-1579/Iyad El Baba 8-year-old Ahmed Al Ansari stands amid the remnants of his family’s home, which was destroyed by Israeli airstrikes, in the city of Khan Yunis, in the southern Gaza Strip.

State of Palestine*

In 2014, UNICEF and partners plan for:
35,100

people in Area C at risk of displacement and 7,500 people in south West Bank have access to increased availability of safe drinking water

26,000

children and 5,900 caregivers in conflict-affected areas benefit from protection and psychosocial support activities

31,000

school-aged children have protected access to safe learning environments

2014 Requirements: US$14,294,000

x Donate Now
Please confirm your country and we will take you to the right donation page:
Location:

Snapshot

Total affected population: 2.1 million
Total affected children (under 18): 990,000

Total people to be reached in 2014: 291,500
Total children to be reached in 2014: 232,800

In 2013, the humanitarian situation in the State of Palestine was largely unchanged, but became even more fragile with the deteriorating situations in neighbouring Syria and Egypt. In Gaza, military operations and escalations of hostilities continued to pose a serious threat to children’s lives, their liberty and their security. The ongoing blockade and severe restrictions on movement depleted family coping mechanisms and led to the significant deterioration of services, which affected all aspects of children’s well-being. In the West Bank, girls and boys are affected by home demolitions and the ongoing military operations, night raids, arrests, poor treatment, harassment at checkpoints and attacks by settlers. In 2013, reported grave violations of children’s rights in the State of Palestine included 1,062 children (1,034 boys and 28 girls) injured, five boys killed and more than 27,299 students affected in 138 school-related incidents.1 Children’s access to adequate health care, safe water, sanitation and safe quality education remains compromised.

Humanitarian strategy

2014 programme targets

Health

  • 30,000 at-risk newborns have access to life-saving drugs and improved neonatal health care
  • 12,000 women have access to specialized health care

WASH

  • 9,000 people in humanitarian situations in Gaza are using appropriate sanitation facilities
  • 35,100 people (50 per cent children) in Area C at risk of displacement have access to safe drinking water
  • 7,500 people (50 per cent children) in south West Bank benefit from increased availability of safe drinking water

Child protection

  • 26,000 children (50 per cent girls) and 5,900 caregivers in conflict-affected areas benefit from protection and psychosocial support activities
  • 100,000 children (50 per cent girls) and 15,000 caregivers benefit from mine risk education
  • Monitoring and reporting mechanism strengthened with improved protection of the rights of children in military detention

Education

  • 31,000 school-aged children have protected access to safe learning environments
  • 20,000 adolescents have increased resilience through after school programmes for play and learning

In line with the 2014 Humanitarian Needs Overview, UNICEF and its partners, including other United Nations agencies and international and national non-governmental organizations, will work closely with local authorities to respond to the humanitarian needs of more than 232,800 affected children, half of them girls. UNICEF will continue to lead the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) cluster, the Child Protection Working Group and the Israel/OPT Working Group on grave violations against children; and will co-lead the Mental Health and Psychosocial Working Group with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the education cluster with Save the Children. UNICEF will provide critical life-saving drugs to neonatal intensive care units for improved neonatal care outcomes. The rehabilitation of water and sewage pipes, water trucking and hygiene education will target highly vulnerable communities. Psychosocial emergency teams and child-friendly centres will continue to provide protection and psychosocial support activities in conflict-affected areas, alongside mine risk education. Monitoring and reporting on grave violations will be strengthened, as will advocacy for improved protection of children in military detention. UNICEF will support protected and safe access to learning for the most marginalized school-aged children, with protective presence during commutes, safe transport and school rehabilitation. UNICEF will also give special attention to the needs of adolescent girls and boys through after school learning and recreational programmes.

Results from 2013

UNICEF appealed for US$27.3 million for 2013, and as of the end of October 2013, US$15,055,520, or 55 per cent of requirements, had been received in contributions. UNICEF and partner response focused on meeting the needs of the most-affected children in Gaza, Area C and East Jerusalem, with particular focus on equality of outcomes between boys and girls. UNICEF supported the repair of water and sewage networks and generators damaged in the November 2012 hostilities in Gaza, and provided chlorine for water disinfection to benefit the entire population in Gaza.2 In addition, UNICEF procured hygiene kits to benefit 3,000 families and 1,000 babies. In response to flooding in the north of the West Bank, UNICEF provided 498 hygiene kits to 1,476 people. UNICEF supported the small-scale rehabilitation of six neonatal intensive care units, and also provided these care units with equipment and life-saving drugs that are expected to significantly improve neonatal survival rates. The ongoing equipping and furnishing of paediatric and obstetric units in two hospitals is expected to improve health services for children and women in the area. UNICEF reached around 15,000 women with breastfeeding counselling through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and through community health workers. UNICEF scaled up the psychosocial programmes implemented in Gaza in family centres, adolescent-friendly spaces, and through five psychosocial emergency teams, reaching approximately 150,000 children, half of them girls. Similar activities ongoing in the West Bank designed to reach 13,000 children (50 per cent girls) and 1,710 caregivers by the end of 2013. In response to the 2012 Gaza crisis, UNICEF supported the repair of 98 damaged schools and procured school bags and stationary kits to reach 88,000 children. In the West Bank, UNICEF supported safe and protected access to schools for approximately 4,800 children. UNICEF also supported after school programmes for 9,600 adolescents, including art, theatre and life skills.

Results through 31 October 2013 unless noted

Funding requirements

In line with the country’s inter-agency 2014 Strategic Response Plan, UNICEF is requesting US$14,294,0005 to meet the humanitarian needs of children in the State of Palestine in 2014. Without additional funding, UNICEF will be unable to provide critical health and WASH services to affected communities. Funding is also urgently needed to provide children and caregivers in highly vulnerable areas with access to protection services and protect their right to education.

_________________________
1 Reported by the Israel/OPT Working Group on grave violations against children.
2 Approximately 1.6 million people, half of which are children.
3 Initial plans for the introduction of community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) were overridden by prioritized needs in neonatal care.
4 The 2013 education target is high (compared to the 2014 target) because it included the response to the November 2012 Gaza crisis.
5 This is aligned with the Consolidated Appeals Process for 2014, with additional funds requested for health.