Map of Côte d'Ivoire
UNICEF photo: A girl is weighed at the Koumassi General Hospital in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire on Friday July 19, 2013. © UNICEF Cote d’Ivoire/2013/Olivier Asselin A girl is weighed at the Koumassi General Hospital in Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire on Friday July 19, 2013.

Côte d'Ivoire

Updated January 2014

In 2014, UNICEF and partners plan for:
325,000

children in humanitarian situations aged 6 to 59 months benefit from free and adequate care to manage malaria, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea

100,000

persons in districts at high risk of cholera receive information on transmission, prevention and treatment of cholera

150,000

children in humanitarian situations have access to formal and non-formal education

2014 Requirements: US$8,100,000

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Snapshot

Total affected population: 1 million
Total affected children (under 18): 500,000

Total people to be reached in 2014: 1 million (including internally displaced persons, returnees and host communities)
Total children to be reached in 2014: 500,000

Although more than 220,000 Ivorians that fled their homes and sought refuge in neighbouring countries after the post-electoral crisis of 2010-2011 have since returned to Côte d’Ivoire, some 75,000 Ivorians remain refugees in the sub-region due to the fragile security situation in the country.1 The security situation is particularly fragile along the border with Liberia due to the continued existence of networks affiliated with the former regime and the presence of former combatants and other armed elements. Risks of violence and abuse against children and women remain high and are worsened by the lack of access to justice for victims and the situation of impunity. Malnutrition rates remain high due to lack of services and limited access to health centres. Conflicts persist over land, lack of employment opportunities and lack of access to basic social services and health centres, and often undermine the sustainable reintegration of refugees in return areas. In 2013, the humanitarian response focused on assisting returning refugees and internally displaced persons and host families and communities in the conflict-affected west, providing these populations with relief packages and conducting activities aimed at rebuilding livelihoods and strengthening resilience.

Humanitarian strategy

2014 programme targets

Nutrition

  • 10,000 children in humanitarian situations aged 6 to 59 months affected by SAM are admitted for treatment 

Health

  • 325,000 children in humanitarian situations aged 6 to 59 months benefit from free and adequate care to manage malaria, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea
  • 20,000 women with complications in delivery receive adequate care

WASH

  • 50,000 people in humanitarian situations access water for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene
  • 100,000 persons in districts at high risk of cholera receive information on transmission, prevention and treatment of cholera

Child protection

  • 10,000 children in humanitarian situations accessing appropriate care and services
  • 500 children in contact with the judiciary system benefit from appropriate care in accordance with international standards

Education

  • 150,000 children in humanitarian situations have access to formal and non-formal education

HIV and AIDS

  • 200 survivors of sexual and gender-based violence are provided with post exposure prophylaxis kits and comprehensive care

In 2014, UNICEF will continue to support the Government’s response to the needs of children and women affected by displacement, malnutrition and poor access to water and protective care, by strengthening emergency response capacity and resilience to crises. Working with partners, UNICEF will support the scale-up of life-saving nutrition interventions by expanding the number of health centres offering treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and antenatal care for pregnant women. UNICEF will continue to support the management of malaria, acute respiratory infections and diarrhoea for children under 5, and will provide orphans and vulnerable children with a minimum package of HIV services to reduce the risks of new transmissions. UNICEF will provide safe drinking water to 50,000 displaced persons and host communities, create a contingency stock of non-food item kits for up to 10,000 families in high-risk areas, and build the capacity of partners, especially to respond to a cholera epidemic. UNICEF will expand community-based, non-formal education and social cohesion and peace-building initiatives, while also supporting teacher trainings on the provision of psychosocial support to children in need. UNICEF will also work to enhance protection systems for the most vulnerable children to prevent exploitation, abuse and neglect, and will provide alternative care services for children in need of special protection.

Results from 2013

UNICEF appealed for US$12,763,000 for 2013, and as of the end of October 2013, a total of US$5,054,819, or 40 per cent of requirements, had been received in contributions. UNICEF and partner response focused on delivering programmes while building capacity at the local level. Health interventions carried out in the most vulnerable regions supported case management of malaria, diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections. Through community-level water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions, UNICEF created first-time access to clean drinking water for 14,000 persons. The cholera epidemic that started in 2012 was halted in 2013 through prevention activities, including hygiene promotion that reached 18,800 internally displaced and otherwise vulnerable persons. Eighty-nine survivors of sexual and gender-based violence were provided with post-exposure prophylaxis kits, appropriate care and psychological support. UNICEF also supported the Government to increase the number of community-based nutrition centres providing SAM treatment. In 2013, 6,450 children with SAM were treated (3,200 were treated in 2012), with a cure rate of 77 per cent. In addition, 7,148,020 children under 5 received micronutrient supplementation. UNICEF provided at least 60,000 school kits to improve access to education in the west. Through support to community protection networks and awareness raising interventions, over 300,000 children are living in more protective community and family environments.

Funding requirements

In line with the country’s inter-agency 2014 Humanitarian Strategy, UNICEF is requesting US$8,100,000 to meet the humanitarian needs of children in Côte d’Ivoire in 2014. Without additional funding, UNICEF will be unable to support the national response to the country’s continuing nutrition crisis, provide critical WASH services to internally displaced persons and support those at risk of cholera. Basic supplies for primary education are also urgently needed to uphold children’s right to education.

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1 Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, ‘Humanitarian Bulletin Côte d’Ivoire’, no. 8, November 2013.
2 Performance of WASH is low because the cholera caseload was lower than expected, and emergency funding for other WASH issues (e.g. water supply and hygiene) was very limited.
3 Performance in terms of access to quality education opportunities provided to displaced children is lower than planned due to improvement in the situation and integration of many of these children into community-based schools.