Civil society partnerships

Partnership Cycle

UNICEF Image
© UNICEF/NYHQ2011-0591/Olivier Asselin
A worker from Action Contre la Faim helps a woman lift a UNICEF hygiene kit at a distribution point . The kit was provided by UNICEF. (Cote d'Ivoire)

Introduction

UNICEF programme priorities and results are outlined in Country Programme Documents (CPD). Country Programme Documents constitute the basis for developing subsequent relationships with civil society organizations (CSOs) during programme implementation.

There are two primary ways of working with UNICEF; Procurement and Partnerships. Each has its own operational considerations and requirements. The below table clarifies these two types of relationships:

 Procurement

Through (Institutional Contract)

 Partnership

Through (MoU, SSFA, PCA)

 
  • UNICEF defines scope of work & results to be achieved
  • CSO identified through competitive bidding process
  • Hired as Contractor or Service Provider against Institutional Contract or Long Term Agreement (LTA)
 
  • UNICEF and the CSO pool resources to achieve commonly defined results, sharing costs and benefits
  • No set amount for contribution but a key requirement for partnership
  • Enter into Partnership through MoU, SSFA, or PCA
 Modalities can be used concurrently with the same CSO

The type of service/activity and its nature determine the relationship. A decision tree and a table showing the type of service and whether a partnership or procurement modality is generally used for the service can help determine the best type of relationship to pursue. .

Procurement services steps need to be followed when a CSO is contracted to work with, or on behalf of, UNICEF through a procurement relationship.

Partnership

Depending on the nature of joint work, a formal agreement may be appropriate. There are three modalities for such partnerships:

MoU
Memorandum of Understanding

SSFA
Small Scale Funding Agreement

PCA
Programme Cooperation Agreement

  • Non-binding agreement only articulates a common desire to work together
  • Global, regional or national levels to achieve shared objectives
  • No exchange of resources among partners
  • Both parties responsible for monitoring & reporting on results
  • Participatory planning of the programme and implementation strategy
  • Legally binding agreement
  • Defines the expected results and related resource requirements, rights and obligations.
  • Maximum UNICEF commitment of $50,000 in a 12 month period
  • Both parties responsible for monitoring and reporting on results
  • Used mainly for capacity building of national CSOs and advocacy
  • In humanitarian response, used mainly as a tool for immediate response while PCA documents are being finalized
  • In humanitarian response, transfer of resources from UNICEF to a CSO of up to $50,000 in a twelve months period and/or transfer of supplies of up to 3 months
  • Participatory planning of the programme and implementation strategy
  • Legally-binding agreement to define responsibility and protect the rights of each partner
  • Umbrella PCA covering the duration of country programme cycle with a CSO
  • Generally more than $50,000 with no maximum ceiling
  • Required minimum one Programme Document (outlined common programme results through a defined strategy, with shared risks, responsibilities, resources and results) to operationalize 
  • Both parties responsible for resourcing the PCA and monitoring & reporting on results

SSFA and PCA involve four main stages (MoUs require separate guidance):

Key Stages involved in partnership

Stage 1: IDENTIFYING CSO

Stage 2: DESIGNING AND FORMALIZING THE PARTNERSHIP

Stage 3: IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING, REPORTING & AMENDMENTS

Stage 4: CONCLUDING, SUSPENSION, TERMINATION

Partnership during humanitarian response

  
 

Stage 1: Initiating the partnershipStage 2: Designing and implementingStage 3: Monitoring and EvaluationStage 4: Concluding the partnership


 

 

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